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Derek Wolf works as a remote Copywriter at Seattle-based startup advertising agency Will+Way. He drafts and publishes creative social media messaging for local tech companies that have international reach. On top of copywriting, Derek is also a stand-up comedian who regularly performs with famous radio personalities and national comedians. Derek finds that comedy has allowed him to creatively express himself off stage as well, and attributes his creative copywriting ideas to his comedic cynicism.

You can follow his content on all social media platforms including:

Instagram: @Wolf.T.Derek

Facebook: Derek Wolf Comedy

Twitter: @DerekDaWolf

Website: www.DerekWolfIsntFunny.com

Kelly Trach is a business coach, podcaster + online course educator. She helps visionary women build digital business with 1:1 services and online courses.

Website: kellytrach.com

Free Quiz: kellytrach.com/genius

Tyana Kelley is a coach who helps women break the cycle of trauma in their families by putting themselves higher on their own lists. I also developed a unique assessment called the 12 Heart Prisms.

Website: www.purplehorizons.com

Class: https://facebook.com/events/s/from-surviving-to-thriving/1050455438670373/?ti=icl

Derek Wolf:
… I’m in love with, too, so it’s been really fun.

Carol Freeman:
Okay, we’re live now. Thank you, everyone, for watching here, and welcome to another episode of Keto Chat. I am your host, Carol Freeman. I am a board certified ketogenic nutrition specialist, and I am in the Epicenter here in the Seattle, Washington, area. We’re all social distancing here and bringing you something to offset all the doom and gloom and the anxiety that has been overwhelming us out there. We’re bringing you positivity, you guys.

Carol Freeman:
Tonight’s episode is going to be about how do we take this time to actually look inside and use it for a time of self-improvement, honing your skills, improving ourselves, rather than just giving up and laying on that couch over there, like my cats do all day long.

Carol Freeman:
I coach people. I’m going to start out and tell you who I am, and then I’m going to tell you about our amazing guests we have. One of the nice things about what’s going on in the world right now is that everybody is unbooked, so I have all the best talent in the entire world at my fingertips. Then, we Derek here, too, so you know… I have all this great talent, so I’m really excited to tell you who we’ve got here tonight, but let me just really quickly tell you about myself.

Carol Freeman:
Carol Freeman, and I primarily work with women, a few men once in a while, but I specialize in helping people figure out this lifelong struggle they’ve had with their weight, being able to follow a ketogenic diet as a lifelong sustainable solution where they can lose the weight, keep it off, and just move their obsession with weight and food to the back of their mind, so that is me.

Carol Freeman:
Just really briefly I’m going to tell you our guests, and then I’m going to bring each of them up. They’re going to spend about 10 to 15 minutes sharing their area of expertise with you, and leave you some exercises to help you find your zone of skill and self-improvement, and all that stuff.

Carol Freeman:
I’m going to introduce you all in the order that we’re going to go; I know I didn’t even tell you guys that. We have Tyana Kelley, and the way I learned to pronounce her name correctly is it rhymes with “Diana.” So, Tyana Kelley, welcome.

Tyana Kelley:
Thank you.

Carol Freeman:
I’m actually going to read your full bio right before I introduce you, so it will be in suspense. Then, we have Kelly Trach. We have Tyana Kelley, Kelly Trach, and Derek is out of order, so I don’t know. We should have had Track Wolf or something. Welcome, Kelly. Thank you you for being here.

Derek Wolf:
I’m always curious.

Carol Freeman:
Then, Derek will wrap up with a few… Derek Wolf is in the Seattle area as well. Thank you all for taking the time out of your busy days and lives to be here with us.

Carol Freeman:
Those of you that are watching, if you have any questions for our experts, please type them in the comments box here. I’m going to have to bring up a couple of our [inaudible 00:02:55] groups because we’re actually live on my page; and it’s a group tonight, so it’s very complicated. Hopefully, you all can see us and chat with us here.

Carol Freeman:
All right, up first it’s my privilege to bring to the stage… here I am pretending I’m in comedy again. Up first, we have Tyana Kelley, a coach who helps women break the cycle of trauma in their families by putting themselves higher on their own list. She’s developed the unique assessment system called the 12 Heart Prisms. I can’t wait to learn about this. I’m going to tell you, Tyana, so many of my clients are in that box of putting everyone first in their lives and they put themselves last, and so I’m so excited to have you here. Thank you so much for being here and welcome.

Tyana Kelley:
Thank you for having me, considering I met you on Friday through social distancing, a Zoom call. It was very fun.

Tyana Kelley:
Yes, I developed this unique assessment to help women because I used to be a doula, a birth and postpartum doula; and what I realize is that so many of us who our moms put ourselves way down on the priority list, and that extends past the first year of life when we have babies, that that just continues on and on, so I wanted to use my skills. I also got a master’s degree while I was a doula, and so I’ve taken the skills that I gained from my doula life, and getting my master’s in strategic communication to become more well-rounded to help moms beyond the first year. I’m also using my own resiliency, and overcoming trauma as a child and as an adult, so I’ve mashed everything together to create this new thing.

Carol Freeman:
Oh, I love it. I love it.

Tyana Kelley:
I’m hope everyone can see this. These are the 12 Heart Prisms. This originated from I developed my own logo, which is this heart, and then I turned each heart prism into its own thing, for a lack of better word.

Carol Freeman:
For those of you that are women right now that can totally resonate with Tyana’s putting everyone else first before you, just give us a yes in the comments here because I know this is a common one.

Tyana Kelley:
Give me an amen.

Carol Freeman:
Yeah. That’s even better.

Tyana Kelley:
The 12 heart prisms, I know I flashed that up quickly and it was hard to read, so I’ll read through them. We have your: village, self-awareness, your willingness to succeed and your willingness to fail, resiliency, goals and dreams, renewal, accountability, honesty, your history, the infrastructure of your life, what does that look like, and your passions. The goal, I take women through this either as our first session in coaching, or I also offer this as a group class, and I offer those pretty much monthly, and we just spend time going through each one on a 1 to 10 scale, and you get to color in. Everybody gets their own black heart and you get to color it in, and it’s really fascinating because everybody gets to see what’s going really well in their life and where they also need to improve. The goal is never to have a completely full heart because this is not realistic, and what I’ve come to realize… is it okay if I say a bad word?

Carol Freeman:
Well, which one?

Tyana Kelley:
Well, I won’t say it.

Carol Freeman:
We’re PG-13, so you’re allowed one F-word per episode.

Tyana Kelley:
Oh, no. It’s the S-H word.

Carol Freeman:
Okay, yes. That’s fine.

Tyana Kelley:
Okay. Balance, we’re all told about balance, work-life balance: balance is bullshit, ladies. Can I get an amen?

Carol Freeman:
Yes. Here we go.

Tyana Kelley:
Because we are taught and told by society that we’re supposed to have this perfect home life, be a perfect mom, put the kids first, and do all these things, and then we’re also supposed to have a career, and then we’re made to feel like crap when we don’t achieve that.

Carol Freeman:
Don’t forget to take time for self-care.

Tyana Kelley:
Society is gaslighting us.

Carol Freeman:
Yeah.

Tyana Kelley:
So, I’m here to help you figure out where you can put yourself first, and so renewal: you notice that my prism is not self-care; it’s renewal. Because you have to constantly be filling your own cup because you can’t serve anyone else from an empty cup, you can’t fill anybody else up. Renewal comes with things like getting enough sleep, eating well, doing things that you love. For me, I love to tap dance, so fun things like that, but just taking really good care of yourself. Do you have a morning routine? Do you have a nighttime routine? It’s not all bubble baths and pedicures, and especially right now when we can’t go out and do the things that we love, and we have to find what we love at home, and how do we fill our cups when we’re feeling isolated? Or maybe we’re feeling a little trapped. Anybody feeling trapped right now in their house?

Carol Freeman:
Almost. Yeah.

Tyana Kelley:
Yeah. So, that is what I do. I would love to answer any questions or hear what anybody else has to say about their [crosstalk 00:09:27].

Carol Freeman:
I’m just going to give a shout out to John. He is our original viewer. I think he’s been here almost every night of this broadcast so far, and this is the fifth night in a row, so John thank you so much. If I could give you some kind of a star or a crown or something like that for supporter.

Derek Wolf:
A top fan.

Tyana Kelley:
Top fan.

Carol Freeman:
Yeah, top fan. Thank you, John, for being here. He’s doing his dumbbell curls. One of our episodes on Saturday was about how to stay active at this time, so he’s being active and still watching the show.

Tyana Kelley:
Nice.

Carol Freeman:
So, thank you so much, John.

Carol Freeman:
For those viewers, please share any questions you’ve got for Tyana in the comments. In the meantime, I’m actually going to challenge our other guests here to ask a question of Tyana.

Tyana Kelley:
Yeah. I would love to answer any questions.

Tyana Kelley:
Another popular thing that we’re dealing with right now, as far as the heart prisms go, is our village, and how do we connect with our village and feel that support from one another when we are isolated? Because I’m a big believer that we are not meant to do this thing called life on our own. We need to have other people supporting us, so how do we do that when we have to keep our distance from one another? If you are struggling with village right now and how to stay connected, I would really encourage you to jump on some Zoom or FaceTime. Some of these video conference tools that we have are so great. I’ve been on Zoom more in the last week than I have maybe in all of [inaudible 00:11:22] combined, I think. It’s been really awesome. Anybody else using Zoom or FaceTime, or any of those other platforms, to get through this?

Derek Wolf:
Yeah. Yesterday, I did, my girlfriend’s dad, we did a 12-way FaceTime thing, and it was really odd. It was really interesting. Until the dogs came in, and then they took over the whole thing, so that’s really about what happened.

Tyana Kelley:
I saw somebody, one of my friends over the weekend, did a Zoom engagement party for her brother. Life looks different, but life goes on, and we’re getting creative and figure out how to still connect in this time. I think, for me at least, I’m connecting with more people during this time than I normally would. Like I said, Carol and I met on Friday in a group Zoom through a mutual friend.

Carol Freeman:
It was a lunch meeting on Zoom. Yeah.

Tyana Kelley:
Yeah.

Carol Freeman:
We’ve got six people watching right now, so I’m challenging that we need some questions from those of you that are watching. What questions do you have for Tyana right now in this time of… how do we take care of ourselves? How do we deal with this pseudo thing we’re told, life balance?

Carol Freeman:
Here’s a question, for those of you watching. What are you struggling with right now with overwhelm? What are all the things that you’re trying to balance and juggle in your life that you need more guidance on? How do you manage all that? How do you juggle everything? Share with us. Dump out your overwhelm. What is it that you’re dealing with?

Carol Freeman:
Kelly, do you have a question for Tyana?

Kelly Trach:
Yeah. First and foremost, I loved what you shared about renewal versus self-care. I thought that was a beautiful and very eloquent way of describing it.

Tyana Kelley:
Thank you.

Kelly Trach:
Because I feel like I’ve never really resonated with the word “self-care,” but I love the concept of renewal. My question for you would be around village. Because I feel like village, especially in the world of today, everything being so digital and with Instagram, it’s like we’re more connected than ever, but quite often I sometimes feel more lonely than ever. Do you have any tips on improving that village aspect of your life when you feel like you’re getting this false community from online and social media, versus in the day you feel like your cup is not really filled up because you’re not really hanging out with people in person? Do you have any tips on balancing that in today’s modern techy world?

Tyana Kelley:
Yes. My best tip is to call your girlfriends because I was in a really dark place a few years ago. I’m an extrovert so I need that social connection, so I have to make a point to make appointments with my friends and call them just like I would call them in high school.

Kelly Trach:
Yeah, I love that. It’s so true. Especially even with making an appointment, that’s such a good idea. In high school it was impromptu call where it’s like, “Oh, hey!” but now I feel like it’s not okay to just do an impromptu call. I’m always messaging my friends at, “Hey, are you free at seven o’clock tonight?” and get it in the calendar, and in high school we used to just pick up the phone and call up your best friend. But today with so much going on, especially going back to what you said about life-work balance, and just us struggling with more things than ever, you’ve got to really get that time in the calendar. Yeah, I love that tip.

Tyana Kelley:
And that’s been really key for me. I will tell people, “Schedule half an hour to an hour,” because that’s the time it takes for both of you to get the time you need to debrief and share what’s going on in your life, and get that voice connection, because this is not the same as hearing people. That’s my big tip.

Tyana Kelley:
Derek, did you have a question?

Derek Wolf:
Yeah. You brought up earlier about just keeping scheduled stuff in the morning and afternoon stuff; and as someone that does work from home multiple days a week, that is something I have an issue with just keeping up. Do you have any tips on how to motivate yourself to just continue doing that?

Tyana Kelley:
Yeah. For me it’s easy because I have eight and a half year old twins, so keeping on a schedule has been easy, but now it’s getting a little harder that they’re home. But I really like to start my day with a little meditation and just get myself grounded, but really the biggest thing for me is I have to shower first thing in the morning because that sets me up. That ensures that I’m getting dressed, and I’m not going to work in my pajamas. I’m not going to have a long coffee. I’m going to just get up and get to it, and drink my coffee while I’m working. I know a lot of people like to sit down at a notebook and do a little journaling, or a gratitude practice, things like that, but just find things that resonate with you. You can Google “morning routine” and you’ll get a million ideas for things that might resonate with you. But I would say keep it to five specific things or less before you start your work day, and just do those things, and do them consistently for 90 days, and that will create your habit.

Derek Wolf:
Great.

Kelly Trach:
I love that. I did a podcast episode earlier this week and I was saying the exact same thing. Self-care is just having that moment of just taking a shower and getting out of your pajamas, and it changes that flick in your brain to be like…

Tyana Kelley:
Yeah.

Kelly Trach:
Other days I’ll be like, “Oh, I’ll just do this now. It’s fine. I’m in my pajamas,” but when you actually have a shower and you, like what you said, have a coffee at your desk and do the work, it’s like, “Oh, I’m really working. This is real,” and you’re taking better care of yourself, so I love that.

Tyana Kelley:
Thanks.

Carol Freeman:
That’s something I’ve had to adjust recently. It used to be that I would work from home all day, I’ve been doing now for years, and I wouldn’t shower. I’d go to work in my PJs, my comfortable clothes. Because I would go out every night and do comedy, and I was going to be on stage, I would shower and do hair and make-up before that, so that was, “I’ve got to get ready by then,” but there’s no more of that. We’re not leaving.

Derek Wolf:
Yeah.

Carol Freeman:
There’s no more comedy, we can’t do any of that, and I’ve had to shift because it’s like doing this show is one of the things that’s helped me like, “This is a hard appointment that I’ve got. I need to be presentable on camera for that,” but I was talking with a friend yesterday where she says showering is the first thing she does every morning, and I normally don’t do that because it was the last thing I would do, and I realized, “I think I need to change my routine and having that as the first thing I do, which sets the tone,” because things are so different now. If I leave the house, it’s because I’ve got to go get groceries or something, but you can do that in your slippers or whatever.

Tyana Kelley:
But should you?

Carol Freeman:
Oh, yeah.

Derek Wolf:
It’s funny.

Carol Freeman:
No, but it’s really having me reassess just for mental health, and setting the stage of, “If I don’t take it in the morning, when is the time I need to take it?” because I’m not seeing anybody that’s going to smell me. I live by myself.

Derek Wolf:
I’m in the same boat as you, Carol, for sure.

Carol Freeman:
It used to be, “No, I don’t want to smell bad when I’m going to go see these other people,” but I can fake from here up that I’ve had a shower when I really haven’t, so that’s true. Reassessing that I was like, “I need that for my mental health and just to set a routine,” so I’m now switching to, “Okay, I’m going to take a shower first thing in the morning,” even though it was something I did later because there’s not going to be any reason to do it, so making it a part of my morning routine is what I’m switching up to.

Tyana Kelley:
Yeah. It’s good that you’re making that connection, though. Because for some people, they’re probably not making that connection yet because this is still all really new this whole being at home all the time, and what is the change to the routine. The earlier that you can make that assessment and adjust your routine to match your new reality, it will make all of this feel more normal and more doable, and make you more successful when you come out the other side, and that’s the whole resiliency piece, right? We don’t want people falling into depression and anxiety about all of this. We want that resiliency muscle to be built up and firing strong through all of this; so that when things do go back to normal, then we just go back to the way it was, as close to that as possible, and just move on. And we’ve all survived it, and we can high-five again, and we’ll all be okay.

Carol Freeman:
Yeah. How many of you watching right now can identify with your routine is changing, you’re having to create a new routine? Tyana likes the amen, and let’s… you know this is for her. Give her an “amen” with the comments right now.

Tyana Kelley:
I’ve been really focusing on helping women through this whole home schooling thing right now. I’ve been going live every day on my business page, Purple Horizons, because I’m still a reluctant home schooler. We didn’t want to be in this boat, but here we are, and how do we get through it?

Carol Freeman:
Yeah. John’s giving an “amen” so… John, one of our foundational fans here, top fan, what’s changed about your routine? Share a little bit with us in the comments there.

Carol Freeman:
One of the reasons I’m being really mindful with myself is I’m an extrovert; and I also know that not only is a love language I have touch, but it’s a human need that we have to touch other humans. We have psychology studies from the ’20s and ’30s that show that touching other humans is an essential for just mental well-being, and I live by myself. I’m a single lady, I’ve got two cats; and I’ve got to tell you as much as I want to snuggle my cats, it’s not the same as human contact. So, for my own mental well-being, I’ve been concerned, and that’s part of why I’m being very conscientious about, “Okay, I’ve gone a week now without touching another human being,” and our governor here just mandated that we not go out and not touch anybody for at least two more weeks. Three weeks, I’m going to go without any human contact, so I’m going to double-down and be very conscientious, “Okay, showering first thing in the morning might be the first thing I do to create this routine, and then make myself mentally well.” You know?

Tyana Kelley:
Yeah.

Carol Freeman:
So, we’ve got [inaudible 00:22:59]. Yeah. Go with that.

Tyana Kelley:
I think those substitutes is going to be really important for a lot of people because we do need those physical interactions. I consider myself lucky that I am in a house with three other people, as an extrovert. It’s okay for me to still hug my kids and kiss my husband.

Carol Freeman:
I’m just afraid that about a week and a half from now I’m just going to go in the grocery store and I’m just going to go and hug a clerk, “Ah! Sorry.” Like they’re going to arrest me for assault or something like that, “No, [inaudible 00:23:33]. It was essential. It was essential touch.” Anyway.

Carol Freeman:
I’m going to move on so that Kelly gets a chance. Tyana, thank you so much.

Tyana Kelley:
[crosstalk 00:23:45].

Carol Freeman:
Any other questions for Tyana, please continue to post those in the comments here. But up next… oh, my gosh. Let me pull up the bio. So, Kelly Trach is a business coach podcaster and online course educator. She helps visionary women build digital business, and one-on-one services, and online courses. I know she’s got a really great exercise she’ll lead us through, and I can’t wait to have her up next. So, welcome Kelly.

Kelly Trach:
Hello. Welcome, everybody. Thanks so much for having me here, Carol. My name is Kelly Trach, and I help visionary women build digital businesses, and it’s based on their zone of genius, and I help them build-up a business with one-on-one services and online courses, up to a place of consistent full-time income, which I define as consistent $5K months and $10K months from your business. But the thing that I stumbled upon, accidentally through my work doing this business for the last three years, is the zone of genius work, and figuring out what is that gift that you have that makes you so unique, and how can you sell that, how can you offer that, and how can you create a service around that? I’m going to be walking you through today of talking about what exactly is your genius, why is it important, and how to find that genius of yours, and whether you build a career around that or a business or a side hustle. You can take it in any direction you like, so it’s not business-focused. Don’t worry if you have a regular job.

Kelly Trach:
I wanted to begin by explaining how I even got into the genius work and understanding what this is. Because back in the day, when people asked me what my story was, I rewind to high school because I feel like it just showed so much about me. I was like your classic overachiever. I did all the things. I wanted to be great at school, and have all these extracurriculars. I worked my butt off. I went to school here in British Columbia in Canada on scholarship. I graduated on the Dean’s list, did every single thing, tried to get all the job offers. After business school was done, I moved down to San Francisco to work on my first tech startup, and I always had wanted to build the biggest, hardest stuff.

Kelly Trach:
Now, I was always chasing these huge challenges. Tech startup one failed. I tried again, and tech startup two failed. I tried a third time, and tech startup three failed, so I had to move back home to Canada. I had a rock bottom aha moment, and I asked myself, “What if I just do what I was good at?” and this was a very life-changing question for me because I never just did what I was good at because I thought that was too easy and stupid, because I was always busy trying to prove and strive, and effort and hustle and achieve, and the irony was that I was trying harder and harder and these businesses were just not working out.

Kelly Trach:
I ended up building a fourth business, which is this one, based on the things that came naturally to me, and I turned it into a six-figure business, but it was all ironic because I was like, “How am I just doing what’s easy to me and natural to me, and it’s working, when all my life I’ve hustled and worked hard?” That’s when I started to peel back the layers and see where my genius was, and how I was indirectly harnessing it, and I reverse engineered it to figure out how to find your genius in what I call “The Genius Framework.” Let me know in the chat. Type “yes” if you agree with that story of learning to hustle, grind, be great at all the things, be well-rounded, improve your weaknesses.

Kelly Trach:
The term “zone of genius” originally comes from a dude named Gay Hendricks who write the book, The Big Leap, and he explains that we have these different pockets of life where we’re either just okay at it, or maybe we’re really good at it, and then we have our zone of genius where we’re truly exceptional, that’s where we thrive, and it’s the things that we do really innately really well. That’s his concept, and that’s the working definition that a lot of us know. The way I describe genius is a little bit differently, and what I describe in my Genius Framework is just a little bit tweaked, based on what I’ve seen for myself and in my clients’ lives.

Kelly Trach:
I want to actually start by talking about the difference between our genius and these things we’re really great at, versus just the traditional strengths, because I think those words get mixed up a lot. When we do an assessment like a strength finder, or learning about what our strengths are… let me know in the chat if you’ve ever done one of those, type “yes”… you usually get a list all the things you’re great at, but usually we’ve been taught to be well-rounded and we’re good at many things. But I like to look at the top three to five gifts; and I call them “gifts” versus “strengths” because on a list of things that we’re good at and the things we have strengths around, at the bottom of my list… like I’m still good as being a decisive, fast decision-maker, but I’m not anywhere close to the speed of somebody in the army or somebody who works in a super high-pressure job, like a surgeon making a life or death choice. But at the top, think about something… Oh, hello from Ontario.

Carol Freeman:
I could find this person’s name because when they share in the group, for some reason we can’t pull their name through, so I’ll go find their name here. So, please keep going, Kelly. Hold on, Ontario person; I’m going to get your name here in a moment.

Kelly Trach:
At the top of your strengths list, I always look at the top stuff you’re really excellent at, and call those just gifts. I like to call it “gift” because it’s stuff you’re really truly gifted at. Out of everything that you’re really good at, to super excellent at, what are you truly, truly gifted at, and I’m going to ask some questions for you to figure out what you’re truly gifted at. But if you take your top three to five here, and you figure out what those are, and you stick them together, and then you look at what those are, and then look at activities where you do all three to five, where you’re harnessing three to five ones: I believe that creates your genius. I know for me through doing work, my four things, the best things that I’m truly gifted at, is teaching, speaking, creating and connecting; and when I do things that involve all four, I create a product that is truly exceptional, and it’s something that is truly my best and highest output.

Kelly Trach:
Why is it so important to find your genius and find this area for you? Well, first and foremost, when you do work this in alignment with it, you feel super fulfilled. It’s truly work that you love doing. It comes easy to you. It’s that quality of work where it feels effortless, and people are like, “Wow, this is so great. Oh, my gosh, this is so easy for me.”

Kelly Trach:
Another great part about doing this work is that when you find it and when you tap into it, you become seen as the thought leader in your space, as the go-to expert in your field or in your career. If we can even think about it\, when we visualize people that we admire at work or in the entrepreneurial space who are just so good at what they do, that’s because they’re tapped into that genius. You can also be in that space, and when you’re doing it you can really charge what you’re worth either in an entrepreneurial sense, what you’re charging for in your business, for maybe your consulting, or your courses, or your coaching. Or in a job in a 9:00 to 5:00, you can really ask for the salary you desire because you’re so truly gifted at this and you’re doing the work that’s in your genius. That’s the value of finding your genius and honoring it, and building a life and a career and a business or a side hustle around it.

Kelly Trach:
So, I have some questions for you guys. We’re going to work through them pretty quickly, but you’re going to get the general gist of the flavor of questions.

Carol Freeman:
Whoever is watching right now, answer Kelly’s questions in the comments.

Kelly Trach:
Yeah. And our goal is to figure out what your gifts are. We want to find those best gifts of yours, and I would encourage you in a journal to write those down. Then, from there, we look at, “Okay, what activities do you do where you’re harnessing all these at once?” and “How do they create a really amazing final product?”

Kelly Trach:
My first question for you is: what are you good at that nobody taught you how to do? I think it’s such an illuminating and eye-opening question because we have those skills that we just know how to do. Nobody taught us, we didn’t maybe take a training or a class, but we’re just good at it. I know for me, I’m very good at just making things and creating stuff. I never have taken a class in Web design or graphic design or anything, but I can make anything out of anything. I’m like, “Okay, this is it. This is done.”

Kelly Trach:
Another great way to look at this is looking at what have you been good at for so many years in your life? Looking back at patterns of consistent hobbies you’ve had for years, stuff where you really find your flow doing things that you truly enjoy. What have you been doing for a long time that maybe you haven’t really taken super seriously, but you’ve said, “Oh, this is just a hobby or this little thing that I do on the side”? There might be a gift inside of that because you love doing it, and it comes so easily and naturally for you.

Carol Freeman:
John says the answer to that question is communicating.

Kelly Trach:
Nice. And you are doing a very good job communicating tonight, John, so we’re seeing this in action.

Kelly Trach:
Another question I have for you is: what things come naturally to you when you see other people struggle, and not from an egotistical sense of, “Oh, I’m better than you,” but where you can notice other people doing something and you think, “Oh, my goodness. They’re actually having a really hard time with that.” I know for me in business school we had a class on public speaking, and I remember thinking, “Oh, this is easy. This is an easy A. You show up and you talk. How hard is it?” but some people were really sweating and having a hard time, and that was the first time I realized, “Oh, maybe I’m better at this than I give myself credit for.” Think of scenarios like that in your life.

Kelly Trach:
Another question is: where do you lose track of time? This taps into the concept of flow; and when we find our flow, it’s usually also where we find our gifts and our genius. So, think about the stuff you could do forever. I like to ask the more probing question of, “If you had a spare weekend or a spare Sunday all to yourself, what would you do to fill that time?” and there might be some activities you do or things that you do that underneath have a gift or a quality which will be more pronounced. I know for me growing up, I loved making jewelry. I loved making any little craft or things, and that’s because I loved creating stuff just out of nothing.

Carol Freeman:
It doesn’t count if I lose track of time watching TikTok, right?

Kelly Trach:
Well, maybe there’s something in there for you. What you enjoy and what you enjoy doing, and also the people you respect and admire, is also a reflection of your own gifts. I love watching TikTok, too, and one of the things I’ve learned from doing a lot of this work is I feel like I bring a lot of joy to people, and I also gravitate towards things that bring me joy, so that’s another great question, too. I always like to ask, “Who are the top five people you admire and why?” and if you list out those five reasons why you love them, those are very quite frankly the gifts inside of you, too, because what we see in others is really what’s a reflection within us.

Carol Freeman:
I like the entertainment part of it, but I also really admire the people that can dance on there, and I can’t do that. I wish I could do that.

Kelly Trach:
I know. They’re so good. I’ve been trying to learn some of those dances, and I’m like, “Oh, my God. Some of these girls are expert-level dancers here.”

Carol Freeman:
Yeah.

Kelly Trach:
Another great question is: if money wasn’t an option, what would you be doing? I find this is a great question to figure out some of the gifts that you might have, and not really recognize as gifts. Because if you know money wasn’t an option and you could do anything and get paid for it, what would you be spending your time doing? Probably the stuff where you find flow, where it’s easy for you, what’s simple for you, and what you enjoy.

Kelly Trach:
Another interesting question has to do with shadow, understanding our shadow, which is the dark side of us. We all have a light and a dark side, and the shadow side is the side we usually hide from society and stuff we try to actively avoid, and it’s usually what we also don’t like in others, so it’s the same concept of what you judge in others is what you judge in yourself.

Kelly Trach:
It’s also very interesting when we think of what’s something we really don’t like in other people, and then how is the inverse of that our genius? I’ll give you an example: I really don’t like fake people. I cannot stand people who are fake or pretentious, or where they wanted to have surface of conversations, and indirectly something that I’m really gifted at is being my authentic self, and showing up as who I am, and trying as much as I can to be who I really am. So, that’s another way sometimes to find your gift is look at what you don’t like in people, and look at the inverse, and say, “Maybe I’m just really good at doing that innately.”

Kelly Trach:
Another question to ask yourself is: what are people already coming to you for? What questions do they ask you? What are your friends calling and asking you about? What kind of advice are you giving? What are people already coming to you for? That can be reflective of the gifts inside of you.

Kelly Trach:
The last question I want to propose is: what’s too easy for you that you talk yourself out of doing? There’s a lot of stuff around the genius work that I teach, around unraveling our mindset blocks, because quite often we’re taught, “No pain, no gain. You’ve got to work really hard to succeed,” and we have this notion in our head that we have to work super hard in order to be successful; and if we do things that are too easy, it doesn’t count. I know that was the case for me in my previous businesses, and all my past failed attempts in tech. I just didn’t lay into the things that were easy for me because I thought that this wasn’t how it was done. Ask yourself where in your life are you talking yourself out of doing something because it’s just too easy and too simple?

Kelly Trach:
Let me know in the comments if there’s anything that’s coming to mind for you guys, or anything that you feel like, “You know what? Maybe I have a gift in that certain sense,” or maybe there’s just something that’s coming up. Or maybe you’ve been thinking about these questions and you see a theme in your life, or you see parallel themes coming up. I would love to know what kind of gifts are coming to mind. When you find those top three to five gifts, look at them on paper together and think, “What activities do I do that harness all of these at once?” and that’s your genius. That’s your best work. That’s your best and highest output.

Kelly Trach:
That is the genius framework in a nutshell, and I’d love to answer any questions if you have any.

Carol Freeman:
Yeah. I’m thinking about two different perspectives here, and one is my keto people that are watching. My clients start learning a very easy and simple way of doing keto, and their appetite goes down, and their weight is coming off. They’re used to decades of most of their brain space was thinking about their weight, “How do I lose this weight? How do I get off this weight? What do I do? What diet am I going to try?” and they find themselves, after working with me, that all of a sudden they’ve got 90% of their brain power free, and they often then go, “Oh, my gosh. I need a hobby. I need to figure out what am I going to do. How do I harness all of this?” So, this is really applicable to all of you out there that have been working with me on keto, and you find yourself with a bunch of extra brain space. You get to have something else now in your life. Whether it’s a career change, or a new hobby, or volunteering, this is the way of discovering all that, so it’s really relevant. I hope that you tap into all of what she’s saying; it’s really important.

Carol Freeman:
But also unfortunately at this time we have so many people that are being laid off, your job is no longer, and it’s sad and it’s tragic what’s going on. Also, the theme of this show is to use this time. Take some time to reflect on all these questions that Kelly has had, and use this as an opportunity to figure out what is it that you really, really want to be doing with your life and your talents? What is it that you’re so good at that nobody taught you, and what comes so easy for you? I encourage, from those two different perspectives, and maybe you’re in both camps, to just take this opportunity to see what gifts you have out there.

Carol Freeman:
All right. Then, Tyana and Derek, it’s your turn to ask questions. What questions do you have with kelly?

Tyana Kelley:
I love this so much.

Kelly Trach:
Thank you.

Tyana Kelley:
And I want to talk to you after this.

Kelly Trach:
Thank you. I want to talk to you after. Look at this: [inaudible 00:39:53] friendship happening all the time.

Tyana Kelley:
It’s just so interesting because I have actually shifted my careers a couple of times in the last few years. I stopped doing my doula work after I graduated with my master’s and went into branding, and was doing logo and Web design, and brand strategy workshops, and I found that it was too lonely for me. I went into coaching after that, and just started working with more than just women in that first year of birth and postpartum, and so going through these questions I’m like, “What is my zone of genius?” I’ve done the Roger James Hamilton Zone of Genius quiz.

Kelly Trach:
Oh, I don’t know what that is. I should Google that.

Tyana Kelley:
Yes, Google that one, too. I was a creator in his Zone of Genius thing, so I’m very interested. Can you repeat the person’s name that you said?

Kelly Trach:
Yes. His concept is different, but he’s the first person that coined that term. His name is Gay Hendricks, and he wrote the book, The Big Leap. He only talks about zone of genius for a chapter in there, but most of it is about how you combat your upper limit problem. It’s a really interesting book, but he’s the dude that made it.

Kelly Trach:
Actually, on the topic of quiz, I do have a quiz on how to figure out your genius at kellytrach.com/genius.

Carol Freeman:
Wow. Sweet.

Kelly Trach:
I know. I try to guess it in eight questions. In eight questions I try to guess, but I do my best with an algorithm thingy.

Derek Wolf:
Fantastic. I really like… I’m sorry. Were you finished with your question?

Kelly Trach:
Yeah.

Derek Wolf:
I’m sorry. I apologize.

Derek Wolf:
It’s really interesting because I do… earlier how you were talking about breaking down your genius into three to five [inaudible 00:41:58], because I do talk to a lot of people and try and take that same approach, and I’m not talking about careers and stuff. Ever since I got my degree in advertising… and I wanted to always be a copywriter, but I’ve always been doing stand up comedy… so when I got to Seattle and started actually working after college, I did half and half because I could, and then found out where I could make money in the comedy part and what I enjoyed, and then also in the advertising part. So, it is really interesting that you brought that up because that is really the same approach that I’ve taken a lot with giving people advice and stuff. That’s appreciated. That was cool.

Kelly Trach:
Thank you. I appreciate that. It’s interesting that both you, Tyana and Derek, you guys both come from that marketing. Because I went to business school, but I specialized in marketing. Carol, do you have any marketing? You have a sales background. We’re all kind of…

Carol Freeman:
Yeah. My degrees were in nutrition and psychology, but I studied sales and marketing just in the real world for longer than I’d say most of those other things.

Derek Wolf:
Yeah. That was super weird. Today, I was actually supposed to go back… I got accepted to give advice to young professionals at Washington State University through the Communication College, but then the whole thing got canceled, which sucked, but I was super… Lester Holt was supposed to accept the Murrow Award and stuff. It was going to be super cool, but yeah.

Tyana Kelley:
That’s where I got my master’s.

Derek Wolf:
[crosstalk 00:43:25]. Awesome. Go Cougs!

Tyana Kelley:
Yeah.

Derek Wolf:
But, yeah. It’s interesting. It’s cool that this happened today.

Carol Freeman:
Those of you who are watching right now, who’s got some comments for Kelly, comments or questions about discovering your own zone of genius? Who’s having an aha right now where maybe you’re feeling like, “Maybe I’ve been working in the wrong field my whole life. Maybe this is a gift, a time I can use to just realign myself with my passion, my gifts in the world.” So, give us your ahas in the comments there.

Carol Freeman:
Thank you, Kelly, so much for that. I can’t wait to go take the quiz, as soon as we’re done here, myself.

Kelly Trach:
Thank you.

Carol Freeman:
Oh, my gosh. All right. Up next we have a very special guest. All the way from Seattle, Washington, Derek Wolf. He works as a remote copywriter at a Seattle-based startup advertising agency. Do we need to mention them? I don’t know. Do you want to plug them?

Derek Wolf:
It’s a world-class [inaudible 00:44:29]. That’s what I call them.

Carol Freeman:
[inaudible 00:44:30]. He drafts and publishes creative social medial messaging for local pet companies that have international reach. On top of copywriting, Derek is also a stand up comedian, regularly performs with famous radio personalities and national comedians. Derek finds that comedy has allowed him to creatively express himself off stage as well, and attributes his creative copywriting ideas to his comedic cynicism. I’m going to let you plug your own later, and we’ll put it in the show notes as well, too.

Derek Wolf:
Do it later. That’s fine.

Carol Freeman:
I know Derek through stand up comedy in the Seattle area. We, up until recently, until everything shut down, were comedy co-producers in the Seattle area. We had the hottest room in Seattle. All the comedians [inaudible 00:45:15] stage. Now, that stage is in my garage downstairs.

Derek Wolf:
Glad you got it out of the car.

Carol Freeman:
Yeah. Oh, yeah. No problem. I should have videoed it. Maybe I’ll put it back there and show that.

Derek Wolf:
Yeah.

Carol Freeman:
Derek, thank you for being here. Share with us. What have you got for us about how to use this time for self-improvement?

Derek Wolf:
I wrote a couple writer tricks, and stuff like that. I usually work from home Monday, Wednesday and Fridays, and so luckily all our clients are all digital sales, stuff like that, with website domains and stuff, so I’m still continuing to do that. I just want to give some tips that I’ve learned that have really helped, and then other things that I’m doing right now with more freed-up time with not having the stand up, and just doing that three days a week.

Derek Wolf:
The thing I’ve been trying to do for myself is really improve the skills that I have in marketing and advertising. Especially, if you’re in the creative space, everything is always evolving and you’ve got to keep up, you’ve always got to be ahead of the game and stuff. I’m actually doing an Instagram course that teaches you how to really go into the basics of that stuff, actually. What is it? Instagram Instago? Is that what it is, Carol?

Carol Freeman:
Instago?

Derek Wolf:
Instago. Yeah.

Carol Freeman:
Oh, Readysetgrad is what the training is.

Derek Wolf:
Readysetgrad. Yes, that’s it. I made it to the first lesson, but anyway… But that’s a really good [crosstalk 00:46:50].

Carol Freeman:
I just know that when you’re going through Sue B. Zimmerman, for anyone who has any time to do that.

Derek Wolf:
Suebsays, that’s the… and it’s great because I’ve always loved Instagram. The past few years, I’ve really been trying to build an audience on there, and I’ve been obsessed with that, but now it’s cool that I have the time now to really invest in something that doesn’t really get any return on yet, but it’s nice to invest that time into learning more about it, so I can eventually get to that point through that. Just anything that helps you be better into what you want to do in your free time, is something I think I would recommend when you’re working from home, and have that free time to do it for yourself.

Derek Wolf:
Then, the next part would be setting goals for yourself, I do that all the time, or if you’re working from home or taking a course. It’s always important to set end-of-the-day goals to make sure that you do get to those points where you want to be, and you also feel proud of yourself for being productive. That’s the thing where it’s easy to get distracted and procrastinate when you’re home, when you have TV sitting in your room, and all that stuff. It’s super easy to just not do it and push it off, but really separating yourself and setting an area for yourself that you only associate with work I think is the best thing, so then you can reach those goals. Immediately when you walk into that room, you’re primed to go. Sometimes if I’m too distracted I’ll go, “Not right now,” but I’ll go to the Starbucks, and then it will be like, “I’m not leaving for two hours.” So, I’m doing two hours of work, plug it in, get away from everybody, and then at least you’ll make some progress. Whether it’s good or bad, you’ll have something, and that’s always helped me, especially when your time management is less strict. That’s something that’s always helped me for sure.

Carol Freeman:
I think that’s a really great tip, right?

Derek Wolf:
Uh-huh (affirmative).

Carol Freeman:
Most people are working from home, or they’re trying to work from home.

Derek Wolf:
Yeah.

Carol Freeman:
Even if you’re laid off, what do you do with the whole day? So, setting a schedule for yourself and following that is…

Derek Wolf:
Exactly. Yeah. It’s also very important, too, to reward yourself after that; that’s what I do. I’ll be like, “Hey, you write for an hour, and then you can play video games later.”

Carol Freeman:
I’ll set a TikTok timer for 15 minutes and watch TikTok.

Derek Wolf:
Exactly. You’ve got to take time for yourself. You’ve got to reward yourself.

Derek Wolf:
The last thing I want to talk about, I think we all talked about this kind of just connecting with people. I think Carol you were talking a lot about how you wouldn’t shower until you go out to do comedy, stuff like that, and I was in the same boat, but what I would do was force myself… I’d get on shows later in the week so on a Wednesday, if I worked from home, I’d be inside all day, and then I’d be, “Okay, I have comedy at 8:00. I have to shower,” or I could just lay in bed all day, but it’s like, “No, I committed myself to the people that I want to see,” and I’ve never regretted not going to those things. So, just having some-

Carol Freeman:
I thought you were going to say you’re never good at not showering.

Derek Wolf:
Oh, no, no.

Carol Freeman:
Or regretted showering.

Derek Wolf:
Well, forcing myself to interact with people, it would always make me a lot happier than not doing it, so I think that’s a very important thing for people to do, especially in this time. Do that, but change it to the digital era. Do a book club or something where you meet with your friends once a week, stuff like that, and you’re held to some sort of goal you have to reach for… It’s like Me I [inaudible 00:50:36] with my buddies so it’s at night we’re all having some sort of social interaction in that aspect. Even though we can’t leave the house, we’re doing something together.

Carol Freeman:
This might be a fun concession for those of you guys watching right now. How long has it been since you’ve showered? Tell us in the comments here. Confession time. We’ll get a humorous take here. Yeah, that’s a great tip.

Carol Freeman:
Derek, how long has it been since you showered?

Derek Wolf:
I showered two hours ago.

Carol Freeman:
Oh, way to go!

Derek Wolf:
Shaved.

Carol Freeman:
Yay!

Derek Wolf:
[inaudible 00:51:16] two days.

Carol Freeman:
That’s great. I’ll take it personally. Thanks for showering for us.

Derek Wolf:
Of course. Yeah.

Carol Freeman:
We have seven people watching us, and as soon as I said, “How long has it been since you showered?” we dropped to three.

Derek Wolf:
They’re probably jumping in the shower, though.

Carol Freeman:
We’re going to have people watching the replay, too. Join in. This is lots of fun here.

Carol Freeman:
I’m going to pop-in a question here that John asked that’s going to be related to Kelly, and then I’m going to have Kelly and Tyana ask some questions of Derek.

Carol Freeman:
What do you say about this, Kelly: what if you do your questions and you notice that, “Oh, my gosh. I’ve got a couple of zones of genius,” but like laying on the beach? You said, “I’m really good at laying on the beach.” What do you say if you find that your zones of genius probably don’t pay very well?

Kelly Trach:
Yeah. This is a lot of what I talk about as well. Especially when it comes to gifts that we have stories around in our head. Especially things that are more creative or artistic, sometimes you get that mindset, because we have patterns of the starving artist mindset and mentality. This comes back to the money mindset work and doing the money mindset work. I really believe you can make money doing the things you love to do, and the things you are truly good at, and it comes… for this my favorite book of all is Jen Sincero’s, You’re Badass at Making Money, and it’s so true. Because even if we feel like we can’t make money using our creative gifts in the world, there’s other people that have gone on to do it.

Kelly Trach:
Jim Carrey is an amazing comedian, he’s also from Canada, but people that have gone on to do what you want to do, authors that you really respect and admire. A lot of people are like, “Oh, writing doesn’t pay the bills.” Well, Jen Sincero is making a lot of millions off her book, so it’s about finding those people who are already doing it, and proving that you can do it, too. It’s about strengthening your money mindset. In other words, it’s called “wealth consciousness.” It’s whatever word you like to use, but changing those stories you have around money, and getting rid of the patterning that says, “You can’t make money doing that. You have to have a more stable career. Do something that makes money.” So, it’s more about letting go of those stories, and changing that through changing your beliefs, but also finding other people who’ve already done it.

Kelly Trach:
It’s one of those things I always believe: I think if you really, really want it bad enough, you’ll figure out how to make it work, and how to make money off of it, and it is totally available to you with just changing the beliefs, and another thing that, “If other people can do it, you can do it, too.” So, that’s a great question, and it’s something that a lot of people get hung up on, and rightfully so. It’s a lot of the society narratives of what we can and cannot make money doing, but I encourage you just to challenge your beliefs and perceptions a little bit, and see if there’s maybe even a little bit of room to try to get paid doing what you love to do.

Tyana Kelley:
Can I chime-in on something real quick with that?

Carol Freeman:
Kardashians get paid for laying on the beach, so come on, John. You can do it, too.

Derek Wolf:
I get paid to write Tweets so…

Tyana Kelley:
I think that there is a huge pressure also right now to monetize every single thing that we do, and we need to also let go of some of that. If you have a hobby that you love that gives you a lot of pleasure in just doing that thing, you don’t have to monetize it, and monetizing it can actually reduce your pleasure, and it decreases that renewal piece. There’s a lot of pressure to do the side hustle, and it’s okay. If you’re in a place where you don’t need it financially, just enjoy it for the sake of enjoying it. That’s my advice.

Derek Wolf:
I agree. That’s right. That’s a great point.

Kelly Trach:
Yeah. I agree, too. I agree, too.

Carol Freeman:
I think this is a comment for the question about how long it’s been since you’ve showered. Mike was a guest on your Saturday show and he’s been watching diligently as well. So, thank you for chiming-in, Mike. Thank you for showering. I don’t know how long it’s been before then, but you know…

Derek Wolf:
That doesn’t matter.

Carol Freeman:
Cool. John just scheduled his… anyway.

Carol Freeman:
What questions do Kelly and Tyana have for Derek?

Kelly Trach:
I have a question for you, Derek. You were talking about building your Instagram following. You said that’s for your comedy and your copywriting work. I’m just curious as to how you’ve been getting your name out there, how you’ve been extending your reach.

Derek Wolf:
For Instagram, it’s mostly been just for the comedy aspect of it. I started a new profile about two years ago. I’ve been interested in imagery and stuff, and so I just really decided to try it after I graduated, and really just been posting a bunch of pictures from comedy shows. I also used to work at a radio station, so I go to concerts all the time, so I’ve got content through that, but then also doing blogging and stuff. I do a mock Gary Vaynerchuk kind of thing.

Kelly Trach:
Cool.

Derek Wolf:
Yeah. It’s like inspirational, but dumb, so that’s the whole…

Kelly Trach:
I love that.

Derek Wolf:
Yeah. I did one off the files like, “Hey, I’m just going to try this,” and the people really reacted to it, and then I was like, “Okay, I’m just going to keep doing it,” and branding myself onto that. That’s how I’ve been getting a following. It’s just word of mouth, and following other comedians and stuff.

Kelly Trach:
Cool.

Tyana Kelley:
I love stand up comedy. I want to try it some day.

Carol Freeman:
Ah.

Derek Wolf:
Yeah. Well, everyone is doing it from their living room right now.

Tyana Kelley:
I have a friend who said that I remind her of Seinfeld, so I was like, “Yes.”

Carol Freeman:
Oh.

Derek Wolf:
Oh, there you go. That’s awesome.

Carol Freeman:
In six or 12 or 18 months… or whatever the world gets back to normal, Tyana… we’ll have you out for one of our open mics when we open things back up again.

Derek Wolf:
There we go.

Tyana Kelley:
Just in time. I have enough time to write something.

Derek Wolf:
Yes.

Carol Freeman:
Derek, I’m going to go out on a limb right now and I’m going to promise her a guest spot on one of our shows back when we can do that.

Derek Wolf:
You got it.

Carol Freeman:
Yeah. Well, you’ve got to do the open mic first, but yeah. There you go. You’ve got an open invitation [inaudible 00:58:03] genius. We’re going to save a spot for you. That’s how [inaudible 00:58:08].

Derek Wolf:
Yeah. we’ve got one for you, too, Kelly. Don’t worry.

Kelly Trach:
Okay. I’ll do a little road trip down there because I’m in Vancouver.

Carol Freeman:
That’s awesome. Other comments or questions? How about those of you watching? Who’s got comments/questions for Derek, Tyana or Kelly? Last time here. We’re going to wrap this up, you guys.

Carol Freeman:
John says he stutters, “No stand up for this kid.” Actually, who is the comedian in the Seattle area who has a stutter and he is amazing? He’s so funny. Derek, do you remember that guy? Have you seen him?

Derek Wolf:
I haven’t seen him for a while.

Carol Freeman:
[inaudible 00:58:52]. He came to our open mic before, too, but maybe it was one of the nights that you were off. Is it Jeremy something? I want to say Jeremy McDonald. Isn’t that him?

Derek Wolf:
Yeah. I think, yeah.

Carol Freeman:
Stuttering is no excuse for not doing stand up. He is amazing. He’s so hilarious. So, John, you’ve got to-

Derek Wolf:
You’d never know, but he brings it up, which is great.

Carol Freeman:
Yeah. Oh, my gosh. All right. We’re going to go ahead and wrap this up. We’re been streaming for virtually an hour now. This has been so great. Thanks for hanging out with me.

Carol Freeman:
Those of you that are watching, thank you so much. We’re going to transition over and actually be broadcasting just from my Facebook page. Tonight, we’re in the group and also on my business page, and we’re going to actually, from going forward, we’re going to be steaming live on my business page; that way, people don’t have to join the group to be able to have access to this. Those of you that are watching, please share this with anyone that you know right now could use some positivity, some redirect, some hopeful and optimism in this time, anyone especially who is following or wants to follow a ketogenic diet for optimal health and well-being. Please share [inaudible 01:00:07], how you give us the compliment. Every single night, 7:00 p.m. Pacific, we’re going live. I’ve got guests booked out for the next week already, too. I’m excited to share all of that, too.

Carol Freeman:
The way that I’m going to wrap this up is I’m going to have each of you… this is what I call “the lightening bolt round.” This is what I do in my coaching, how I close-out my coaching calls, but it’s how we’ve been doing this here as well on these live shows. We have some other comment here again about… anyway, sorry. We’ve got a comment about, “We’ll look up the website.”

Carol Freeman:
Oh, John is asking, “Do you need a dad joke?” Come on, John. Share the dad joke with us.

Derek Wolf:
Let me hear it. Let me hear it.

Carol Freeman:
Let’s hear it, John. Let’s hear the dad joke. We all need some jokes at this time.

Carol Freeman:
But somebody else was saying, “Couldn’t answer all the questions so quickly.” The nice thing is this recording is going to be up there; you’ll be able to re-watch again. Also, I’m going to invite each of our guests to share their contact information with you here very shortly.

Carol Freeman:
If you’re watching and you missed all of Kelly’s questions, then I encourage you to follow up. Also, if you comment here, Kelly is going to go back through and she’ll find you… she’ll find you. She’ll find you and she’ll share all the questions with you privately, too. If you want those questions again, make a comment as well, and we’ll have Kelly follow up with you. Also, if you want the prism framework as well, make a comment, too, and we’ll have Tyana follow up with you, too, and if you want the work from home Instagram strategies for Derek as well.

Carol Freeman:
So, lightening bolt round. This is where each of you share your aha, your takeaway from this. Also, feel free in your closing to share how people can contact you. If you have some kind of a freebee… or the quiz, Kelly, again if you want to mention that… or anything else that you’d like to share with people to connect with you, do that as well. Is that too many things for you to remember what to say?

Tyana Kelley:
Hopefully not. Do you want to go the same order as we started with?

Carol Freeman:
Totally random whoever wants to go first.

Tyana Kelley:
All right. I’m already talking, so I guess I will. I guess my big takeaway was the genius questions, and I really want to follow up with Kelly about all of that.

Tyana Kelley:
My contact information, I am Tyana Kelley. My company is Purple Horizons. My website is PurpleHorizons.com, very easy.

Tyana Kelley:
What I want to share with you is that I have my next heart prisms class, which is called, “From Surviving to Thriving,” it’s on my website, and I just got that all up and scheduled for April. It’s a four-part class and it’s just 30 minutes each day, and we’ll go through three heart prisms every day, and it’s just $50 for all four days, and there’s no homework. We do it all in class, so I think that’s a big plus for a lot of people, is that the value is all self-contained in the class. You don’t have to do a lot of homework.

Tyana Kelley:
I really loved being here, and thanks for inviting me today.

Carol Freeman:
Thank you so much, Tyana. Thank you. We’ve got somebody that’s saying they want the prism, so I’ll let you go back and follow up with people, too.

Tyana Kelley:
Okay, great.

Carol Freeman:
Thanks for being here.

Tyana Kelley:
Thank you.

Kelly Trach:
I’ll go next. I think my biggest aha moment, number one, is that instead of calling it “self-care” call it “renewal.” I love that. Also, I just love connecting, the four of us, in this chat and seeing you guys on video. This feels so fun, and it definitely is the highlight of my day, and as an extrovert I feel like I really needed this. So, just that reminder to connect and meet people and just get creative with how we can stay connected during this time I think is just so important.

Kelly Trach:
You can find me at KellyTrach.com. My last name is spelled T-R-A-C-H, even though I pronounce it like “track and field.” You can take the quiz to figure out what’s your zone of genius at KellyTrach.com/genius, and you get sent a five-page free report on what your zone of genius is based on the quiz, and my suggestions for you if you want to build a business, what you could sell, how you could market it, based on your genius type. You can find me on Instagram @kellytrach. Everything is at just “kellytrach,” just my name. I’ve got courses, coaching, the whole nine yards, but you can all find that KellyTrach.com.

Kelly Trach:
And thanks so much for having me, Carol. It was such a pleasure and an honor to be here. It was nice to meet you, Derek and Tyana. This was really fun.

Carol Freeman:
This is great news. On the screen your name is spelled the way that it’s correctly spelled, so all of you watching you’ll see that, how to connect with her. So, thank you for being here. It’s been great.

Derek Wolf:
Yeah, it’s been super fun. I feel like I’m on a CNN panel right now. Whenever my dad is watching news, I’m like, “Yeah, this is what this looks like.”

Derek Wolf:
My main takeaways from today, I love just the focus on what you’re good at and passionate about, and finding your purpose, and really pursuing that, but also doing that for you, and not just trying to make money off it and make it into something that you won’t enjoy, which I think is the most important part of your passion. Yeah, those were very good takeaways.

Derek Wolf:
You can find me… go and see my comedy promotions, stuff like that. I’m on Instagram @wolf.c.derek, and then I have a Derek Wolf comedy Facebook page. And if you want any copywriting services, my website is www.DerekWolfIsntFunny.com.

Carol Freeman:
Isn’t?

Derek Wolf:
Isn’t funny. Yeah. So, thanks so much for having me, Carol. It was great meeting you guys, and it would be great connecting with you guys.

Carol Freeman:
Wonderful. Kelly, it looks like you’ve got one new Instagram follower already.

Kelly Trach:
Thank you. Hello, John. Thank you for following.

Carol Freeman:
Oh, my gosh. Thank you all of our viewers live and seeing the replay. Thank you so much for watching this. Give yourself the big thumbs up. Thank you, again. We’re going to be live here every single evening, 7:00 Pacific time. If you miss us, the replay is going to be up there as well, too.

Carol Freeman:
So, thank you to all of our guests, and we’ve got a lot of great shows coming up. Thank you, everyone, for being here.

Carol Freeman:
That’s all for now. Bye.

Kelly Trach:
Bye.

Derek Wolf:
Bye, John.

Tyana Kelley:
Good night.

Carol Freeman:
John is our super fan.

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