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Featured Guests:

Jack Slattery

Jack Slattery was a stand-up comedian until the great cancelation of 2020. He’s an avid user of psychedelics and has been practicing transcendental meditation for over a decade.

Becky LeBright

Becky is local mindfulness- and nature-based Expressive Arts Therapist in Washington. She focuses on integrative, creative, strength-based approaches to all that arises along our journeys.

Website: http://innerphoenix.wordpress.com

FB Page: @InnerPhoenix

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Carole Freeman:
Well, hello and thank you everyone for watching. We had some kind of an issue with the other one. Our guests are coming shortly. Thank you for being here. Hopefully you’re going to see this here, so welcome everyone to another episode of Keto Chat. Tonight’s episode is going to be focused on mindfulness. Oh no, it’s not working. (silence)

Carole Freeman:
Let’s see. Let’s see if it’s actually working. Let’s see, I don’t know. Can you guys see me? Is anybody there? I don’t know. My platform is telling me that it’s not working. That is StreamYard. That. Is anybody out there?

Becky Robbins:
Is it the same length for the people that we told about it?

Carole Freeman:
No, because otherwise they get to come in here. Nope. Oh, but [crosstalk 00:01:19]. I’m sorry, I’m sorry. I thought you were asking if it was the same length that we had to join.

Becky Robbins:
No.

Carole Freeman:
No, it should be in the same groups, in the same page, but I’m getting the same error unfortunately. This may not actually be doing anything. So, we’ll go ahead and we’ll deliver our full content. We may not have any live viewers because this doesn’t look like right now that it’s streaming on anything, but it’s going to be recorded and I will still upload it as if nothing happened. Oh boy, oh boy. Hey. Well, the first two days I tried to stream from the other platform I use. It didn’t work, and then the Saturday I had a guy that I watch on YouTube that does lives, he said, “My first three platforms crashed,” because everyone right now is trying to get content out. [inaudible 00:02:09], it’s the one thing that we’ve got.

Becky Robbins:
Yeah. Facebook Live has been working great for me as a backup.

Carole Freeman:
Well, I can’t have three guests on a Facebook Live though unfortunately.

Becky Robbins:
Oh, that’s true.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah, and yeah. There’s issues with recording that. This has been great the last four episodes. So, let’s see. Saturday, Sunday, Monday. So, three episodes we had were really great, and for some reason now it’s not playing nice with Facebook. Well, we’re just going to do our show and people will be watching this at a later time. So, thank you all for tuning in later but again, welcome to our episode of Keto Chat. Tonight, we’re going to be focusing on mindfulness. How do we stay present in the present moment, in this current moment, as a way of maintaining sanity? As a way of not falling down in anxiety spiral. I’ve got a couple of guests here. They’re going to share some really great stuff, so welcome Becky Robbins.

Becky Robbins:
Hello.

Carole Freeman:
Jack Slattery.

Jack Slattery:
Hi.

Carole Freeman:
I am Carole Freeman. I’m going to be sharing with you as well a mindfulness exercise to help deal with emotional eating, stress eating. A lot of people are struggling with that at this moment. A lot of us. So, I’m going to explain why that it’s common right now that people are resorting to that or having a pull towards that, and give you some tips and a little exercise to go through that. So again, thank you for watching. As you’re watching this in the future, please let us know in the comments where you’re joining us from. So, let’s see. We have a free flow here, so which one of you would like to go first? Then I’ll introduce you.

Becky Robbins:
I can volunteer.

Carole Freeman:
All right, Becky.

Becky Robbins:
I’m from Seattle.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah. Becky is a local mindfulness and nature based expressive arts therapist in Washington State. She focuses on integrative, creative stressed …. Stressed. Oh, that was a [inaudible 00:04:13]. Strengths based approaches to all that arises along our journeys, and she’s got an exercise she’s going to lead us through, so welcome, Becky. Thank you so much for being here.

Becky Robbins:
Hi. Yeah, thank you. I brought the monkeys, but I’ve let them out of my mind so I can focus on you.

Carole Freeman:
Oh, that’s great.

Becky Robbins:
So surprise, surprise. I get stressed too. I’m human like everybody else, and so what works for me is figuring out what my body needs to calm down so that I can find out how to calm my mind. Sometimes I have to use both at the same time. So, one of the reasons I decided to go for a mindfulness and nature based therapy style is because nature is one of the ways that I can ground and find my center. I find that I’m breathing more easily, even right now I’m talking about it, I can sense that I’m not breathing as easily as I do when I’m walking out in nature.

Becky Robbins:
So, even right now you can just take a nice, deep breath and check in. Where were you holding? I was holding in my abdomen. That tends to be the place where I hold a lot of my stress and tension, and then that tends to feed up into my neck later. So, one of the exercises I’ll talk about some of the background first, but I’ll lead you through a breathing exercise and it’ll be a lot about noticing your body. Not quite the same as a body scan, but it’s not different enough to worry about it. It’s similar.

Becky Robbins:
So, one of the things that happens in my body and most people’s is it responds to stress. Whether you’re an empath or just somebody walking through [inaudible 00:06:02], you’re probably going to also notice other people’s stress. Unconsciously, your body will also respond to that. So if you’re walking around, you were having a totally chill day and you’re in a different environment and suddenly you notice tension, you might check out, what’s the vibe around me? Ah, there’s some people who are waiting for their prescription and they’re getting antsy, and I’m feeling that. So, my first step I’ll offer you is to check your external environment to see if there’s anything impacting you there when you’re stressed. Then whether or not that’s the case, second level would be to check in with your body and where you’re experiencing that stress.

Becky Robbins:
So, maybe for some you’re gritting your teeth or you’re making a face. Maybe you’re crossing your legs or picking at your fingernails, something that’s a stress response. Maybe you’re clenching your stomach or again, even just as I’m talking, trying to run down the list, feeling that tightness in my chest. My breath isn’t as deep, so slowing down. Okay, where is that? Take a breath there. See if it changes at all, and then we can go into this really cool mindfulness exercise which you can do anywhere, as long as your eyes are open. If you’re driving, maybe not with the eyes closed. So, take a minute with me. I’m sure you’ve all got lots of different body parts that you’re noticing right now, so you work with yours and breathe into that spot.

Becky Robbins:
So, we’re going to just start by putting our feet on the floor. Well, you shouldn’t be driving right now if you’re listening to this, but if you can put your feet on the floor safely and just feel that. Or if you’re sitting with your legs pretzel style underneath you, just feel your sit bones on the floor. Notice your spine. Is it slouchy? Is it comfortable? Then just wiggle around until you get comfortable, you could feel your sit bones on the floor, your feet on the floor if they’re touching. Then if you need to keep your eyes open, do, but if you want to close them, you can do that. Just take a nice, deep breath and notice your body. You have one. What’s it doing? What’s it telling you right now?

Becky Robbins:
Another excellent thing to do on your exhale, is to audibly exhale and to let out that stress. You can even make really silly sounds, because that’s the kind of day you had. That might get it out of your body. So let’s take three more of those together. Just really let it out. Now here’s part of the mindfulness. Noticing, how do you feel right now after checking in with your body and taking several deep breaths? Notice the quality of your thoughts. Is your mind slower, calmer? Still buzzing? Are you thinking about something different now? Is it softer? Then check in with your feelings. Are you feeling anxious, are you feeling worried, are you feeling calm? Whatever word, and if you don’t have words, you can think of a size or a texture. That’s an exercise for another day, but anything that helps you connect with what you’re feeling emotionally in this moment.

Becky Robbins:
Keeping breathing and then checking in, so you’ve checked in with your mind, you’ve checked in with your heart or your emotions. Now check back in with your body. What’s that spot, that place feel like that you were feeling tension in? Is it still tense? Is it relieved a little, or just happy you’ve paid attention to it? So just notice that. I know my stomach is more relaxed. Thank god I’m wearing yoga pants. So, this is step one in this exercise, or this exercise is step one in a series of exercises that I do. So, this is just the check in.

Becky Robbins:
If later you want to try something to really mark how it’s changing for you, you might get a little journal out next to you and write how you’re feeling when you sit down to do this exercise. That way you have a marker to see how different it is afterwards. Then as you continue to do this exercise throughout the day or throughout the week, you can look back at that and see the progress you’ve made. Sometimes that helps rewire your brain to say, “Oh, there’s something that I’m doing that’s working,” because you’re seeing the differences. You’re writing them down. You’re basically doing research on yourself, which is great, and now you have statistics. You could prove to yourself that this actually works. So, that’s one exercise that you can do to deepen the one that I just gave to you. Thank you so much for joining that exercise. Back to Carole.

Carole Freeman:
Wow. That’s great. That is so valuable. What do you think? I know you’re watching the replay right now, so how do you feel? How do you feel? What was the spot you noticed in your body, she led you through that, and then how did you feel different afterwards? I’m wondering. I’m going to challenge everyone who’s watching this to do this once a day. You’ve got time now. You know you have time. Do it once a day and see how this shifts. Really powerful. Very, very cool. We’ve got a little more time here, so I’m wondering. Can you share a little bit about how you got into the work that you’re doing?

Becky Robbins:
Yes. So, being the stressed case that I was, I needed something different in my life. Way back, god it was almost 20 years ago, I took a yoga class. I think it was at 24 Hour Fitness, just a yoga class. I was 24, 25 years old and I remember how I felt, and it was so different. I remember thinking, “Oh my god. I have got to teach yoga. I have to teach this to everyone I know. I want other people to be able to feel this, this difference.” So I went through some teacher training and then I went and continued. They say it’s 500 plus hours. It’s more like 750 hours, but it was a three and a half, four year training over all that got me to be a yoga therapist. During that, I also studied Ayurvedic medicine, which really helped me get in touch with my body/mind connection more and do so through food, which I think is about the time that I met Carole.

Becky Robbins:
I was exploring some of this food connection, and it was just really interesting to see that what I put in my body whether it’s food or media, for that purpose, can really impact me and how I see things, how I experience myself throughout the day. I know I was stress eating today. Crackers, crackers, crackers, and that kind of stuff definitely gets more monkeys in my mind. So, that really touched me onto the mindfulness part of my life, but I didn’t know it yet. That wasn’t a buzzword back then, not for me. So, that was cool. I was doing that while I was working in software, some high tech consulting stuff, and I never could figure out how they were going to come together. Sorry, side note, also I have always been an outdoors person. I have found that nature is my church, if you will. So, that’s where I can find happiness on any given day, and support.

Becky Robbins:
So as I continued towards this path of becoming a therapist, which I did not know I was on, I started randomly getting hit by other people’s cars. I’m a good driver. So, that happened multiple times and it kept happening when I was starting new software jobs. So, I got the memo. Maybe don’t go back. Then I had to figure out which career I was going to go into, and so as I was working with my own body, and diet, and healing, I found the path of counseling has been knocking on my door for a while. What I hadn’t seen yet to bring me to it was that you can really do a lot. You don’t just have to sit on a couch and talk. That is not the only way to do it, so I got outside with people. We go hiking. I do art with people. We make these little cards to speak to different parts of ourselves.

Becky Robbins:
Yeah. There’s so many things. Photography, poetry, dreamwork, so all of these tiny little parts of my whole life that I’ve been interested all along and probably been doing trainings with for 20 years as well, somehow collided in this counseling world. It’s been really helpful for mindfulness because we don’t always have words for things. We aren’t always going to talk it out if there’s something stuck in our body, and our breath is probably one of the first and foremost ways that we have control over our bodies and minds, and we can use it to self regulate. So when I learned that for myself, I knew that I needed to share that with other people and really I feel like counseling for me is a tree with many branches. There’s so many ways to help people. I accidentally found the branches while I was going through my application process to the school I chose. So, the branches picked me and here I am, what you have today.

Carole Freeman:
That’s so cool. I mean, I have a degree, well which was supposed to lead to therapist, but I wanted the education about how to do therapy but not to do the therapy. I had no idea that there was as cool things as what you’ve got going on. That sounds like really fun therapy.

Becky Robbins:
It is fun therapy. For everyone.

Carole Freeman:
[crosstalk 00:17:20] on Saturday. So on Saturday’s show, we’re going to be doing all kinds of arts, and crafts, and hobbies and stuff like that. So if you’re available, I’d love to have you come back and show the card things that you have.

Becky Robbins:
Oh, absolutely.

Carole Freeman:
We’ll talk about that later, too.

Becky Robbins:
That’s another exercise in itself.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah, oh that seems awesome.

Becky Robbins:
Thank you.

Carole Freeman:
Looks like a mini vision board is what it reminds me of.

Becky Robbins:
It’s exact, yep.

Carole Freeman:
Okay, cool. Oh my gosh, so great. Thank you so much, Becky. We’ve been friends for, man, 10, 11. 10 or 11 years.

Becky Robbins:
A long time.

Carole Freeman:
I don’t know, I haven’t seen you in forever though, so it’s so great to connect this way.

Becky Robbins:
Yes. Still, yes.

Carole Freeman:
Look at these times that we’re in. It’s full of anxiety, and grief, and overwhelm and it’s actually so good to be able to connect with a lot of people I haven’t seen in a long time. So, thank you so much for being here.

Becky Robbins:
I’m happy to.

Carole Freeman:
Thank you so much. All right so next we’re going to go on to Jack. Jack, I haven’t known him nearly as long, but Jack Slattery was a stand up comedian until the great cancellation of 2020. He’s an avid user of psychedelics and has been practicing transcendental meditation for over a decade, and crows have brought him gifts before. Can’t wait to hear stories of that. So, welcome Jack. So glad you’re here.

Jack Slattery:
Thank you. Thanks for having me. I’ll take any stage I can get.

Carole Freeman:
What do you have to share with our viewers today, or whenever they’re watching this in the future?

Jack Slattery:
Yeah. Well, honestly it dovetails with Becky’s presentation pretty well, the mindfulness aspect of it, the breathing parts of it. That’s the core of transcendental meditation. Becky, do you do TM at all? It sounds very similar.

Becky Robbins:
No, but it’s similar.

Jack Slattery:
Yeah. It’s just doing that, but longer. Yeah, just longer really. You want to shoot for 20 minute sessions twice a day. I usually only do one, and that’s good, but twice a day is really doing it. It’s really helpful for someone, I mean it’s really helpful for absolutely anything, but for someone who if you want to feel more creative or get in touch with that kind of stuff, it’s great for bringing that up. It’s just great for cleaning, just sweeping the cobwebs out of your brain a little bit.

Becky Robbins:
Could you tell us a little, Jack, about transcenmental … See, I can’t. [inaudible 00:20:09]. Transcendental meditation. Can you give us a little bit of background about different types of meditation? How is that different than, I don’t know, other kinds?

Jack Slattery:
I don’t know. I’m far from an expert, I’m just a practitioner. This is the method I was taught. This is the way I know how to do it, and it works for me. I’m not sure. I guess we could go self flagellation is a form of meditation, right?

Carole Freeman:
[inaudible 00:20:43].

Jack Slattery:
It’s very different than self flagellation in that you’re sitting doing nothing rather than wailing and beating yourself.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah. How did you get introduced to it?

Jack Slattery:
In college, a professor/mentor. He was a practitioner and a teacher of it. I expressed interest in it, and he taught me privately. I got some useful information out of it. Yeah, it was just a few series of private lessons but that’s all you really need to get going with it. It’s very simple, and that’s the whole point is that it’s simple. It’s literally doing nothing. It drives me crazy when people are like, “Oh, I could never do that. I could never shut my brain off,” but that’s not the point. That’s not the point at all. You’re not trying to stop thinking, you’re just trying to stop latching onto an idea and running with a train of thought.

Jack Slattery:
The way he, Dana, described it to me is that you would imagine that you’re at a train station. You just want to sit at the train station, and your ideas as they rise up, as they come into your mind, are trains entering and leaving the train station. You’re just watching the trains come and go, but you don’t get on the train. If you do get on a train, it’s okay. You just get off at the next station and you keep watching. So, that metaphor has always been pretty helpful for me. I don’t know, you’re meditating and then something comes up and you just start thinking about whatever, apples. Or a joke comes up, and you want to write it down. I don’t know, I usually keep a pad near me and I just write down ideas that come up like that. Just get back off the train, just sit back at the station.

Carole Freeman:
So, how long have you been practicing?

Jack Slattery:
About [crosstalk 00:23:03] 10 years. Yeah, about 10 years.

Becky Robbins:
Wow, [crosstalk 00:23:06].

Carole Freeman:
What kind of effects has it had in your life?

Jack Slattery:
It’s given me a lot of just calmness. I’ve been doing it so long now that I can just fall into a breathing pattern anywhere that I am. On a bus, in a bar, wherever and there’s just no tension. It just eases the tension. Good posture helps with that too, and drinking water, but just finding a rhythm in your breathing, I don’t know. It’s a superpower unto itself. You can just be calm anywhere you want. You just, I don’t know, start internally glowing. It’s nice.

Becky Robbins:
Sounds nice.

Jack Slattery:
It’s like a hot tub for your inner body.

Carole Freeman:
Oh, that’s cool.

Becky Robbins:
I’m going to go get in a heart tub.

Carole Freeman:
Sounds like you got everybody’s attention. Well, it’s a really powerful thing and I think it’s great that you mentioned too that a lot of people are like, “Oh, I could never do that because I could never turn my mind off.” Yeah, keep in mind that the goal is not to turn your mind off. It’s to watch it. You’re not trying to stop the trains, you’re just trying to observe them.

Jack Slattery:
Once you do it long enough and once you get into the habit of it, and it is a practice in that you’re not going to be good at it right away, and good at it doesn’t mean good at it but you’re good at it the first time you do it, but it gets better every time you do it. You’ll develop muscles you didn’t know that you had in getting into this brain state and breathing pattern. It does get easier, but the goal is to shut off the movie projector in your brain and just look at the blank screen. That’s kind of the goal. I’m going to totally forget what the Sanskrit word for that is, but there is one. I think it’s samsara, or simsara.

Becky Robbins:
Samsara.

Jack Slattery:
Samsara, yeah. You’re just blank. That is the goal. You’re aware, but you’re blank. You’re aware of your surroundings but your mind is just blank, and it’s great. It doesn’t happen all the time, but when it does happen, it’s really nice. David Lynch is a big fan of transcendental meditation, and there’s several YouTube videos you can find of him discussing the benefits that he’s had. [inaudible 00:26:01]. Jerry Seinfeld said he could have made a few more seasons of Seinfeld had he been doing two. He was already doing one 20 minute session, but if he had been doing two 20 minute sessions, he could have gone a few more seasons.

Becky Robbins:
Interesting.

Jack Slattery:
Again, I’m not an expert. I’m not a doctor, but it lowers your brain into a different type of state. I think it’s the theta wave state, which is essentially REM sleep. So, 20 minutes of a good meditation is equivalent to several hours of sleep.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah, there’s lots and lots of research that validates all the many health benefits of meditation.

Jack Slattery:
Yeah, and I can give you the basic rundown of how to do it if you want.

Carole Freeman:
Sure.

Becky Robbins:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Carole Freeman:
Sure. Lead us through. I mean, we don’t have 20 minutes to do it.

Jack Slattery:
The basics are [crosstalk 00:27:06]-

Carole Freeman:
It’d make riveting show, 20 minutes of us sitting here doing nothing.

Jack Slattery:
The basics are essentially that you just want to find somewhere comfortable to sit, a straight back is preferable. You want good posture. I like to do a little yoga before, just stretch it out. Just stretch it out. You can sit in a chair. I usually sit cross legged on my bed or something, but you can sit wherever, just as long as you’re comfortable. You want to make your hands like this. I find that helps. That keeps your mind [inaudible 00:27:47] as long as your thumbs are erect and touching, your mind is active, you’re not sleeping. That’s why you don’t want to do it when you’re laying down because you probably will go to sleep, and that’s not the point.

Becky Robbins:
Yeah, I can prove that every night.

Jack Slattery:
So yeah, you just kind of sit there. Your hands are belly button area, you just keep your thumb up, and you just close your eyes and breathe like Becky was showing us. If you need a mantra or something like that to just keep you sitting on that bench at the train station, you can go the classic O-M, om, or ram, or any derivation of that really. Whatever works for you, just a very simple tonal sound. It does help, and you can say it out loud or you could just say it internally in your mind. Either one. Real transcendental meditation, this is where it gets a little weird for me because I’ve never paid for the classes, but you’ve got to pay for classes and they give you your own individual mantra. I don’t know how that works. I have my own individual mantra. I believe the curse attached to it that I can’t tell you what it is, or something bad will happen.

Becky Robbins:
Sorry.

Carole Freeman:
What if somebody walked in on you while you were saying it, though? [crosstalk 00:29:14]

Jack Slattery:
[crosstalk 00:29:14] now.

Carole Freeman:
Okay.

Jack Slattery:
I rarely say out loud. Also, sometimes I like to put on three hour Tibetan bowl meditation.

Becky Robbins:
Oh yeah, that’s good.

Jack Slattery:
YouTube videos. There’s some pretty good ones, and just you can set the scene however you want. I go fancy. I light incense, I listen to Tibetan bowls, I get comfy. It’s fun. Then you’re just sitting there with your hands like that and you’re breathing in and out. That’s literally pretty much it. You’re just doing it for 20 minutes and then it gets wild. You’re like, “Oh. Just sit there and breathe for 20 minutes.” Yeah, but it gets crazy.

Becky Robbins:
It does.

Jack Slattery:
You’re brewing this popcorn. It’s just going everywhere.

Becky Robbins:
The monkeys.

Jack Slattery:
The monkey, yeah. Lots of stuff come floating up, and it’s going to be hard to sit on that bench at the train station at first. You’re going to ride all these ideas all over the place, and that’s totally fine. Just keep doing it. Just keep doing it, but a word of caution. Don’t do it, especially when you’re first starting, don’t do it for more than 20 minutes in one go. Don’t think, “Okay, I’m going to do it for 40 minutes all in one go and just get it over with,” because you’ve got a lot of sludge in your brain. You’ve got a lot of dark stuff in there, so you’re going to pull up a lot more than you want to deal with way too fast. It’s serious. Go slow.

Carole Freeman:
Well, that’s the American way. If some is good, more must be better.

Jack Slattery:
Right. [crosstalk 00:30:45].

Becky Robbins:
No, moderation.

Jack Slattery:
It is not. You can go into a weird depressive funk for a while if you meditate too hard, too fast.

Becky Robbins:
Yeah. Good cautionary tale.

Jack Slattery:
So, 20 minutes at a go, twice a day ideally.

Carole Freeman:
Is it okay if people start out with five minutes or a minute first if they’re starting out?

Jack Slattery:
I’ve never been a half dose kind of guy. I do the full thing, but if that’s what makes you feel better and comfortable, sure. Build up to it, whatever. It’s more about just starting it.

Becky Robbins:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Carole Freeman:
Last Saturday actually, our show, somebody brought up streak trackers. So, this will be a great thing to be able to start to track, and so there’s some apps out there that you can track. There’s apps for run streaks, but there’s also apps that just track how many days in a row you’ve done something. So for those of you right now that have some extra time and you’ve always wanted to do meditation, you can download the Streak Track. It’s not this kind of streaking, but Streak Tracker.

Becky Robbins:
That’s so fun.

Carole Freeman:
Challenge yourself to start meditation. [crosstalk 00:32:03].

Jack Slattery:
Now is definitely the time, right?

Becky Robbins:
[inaudible 00:32:07].

Jack Slattery:
How many Netflix shows can you watch in a day?

Becky Robbins:
You can get that streak.

Jack Slattery:
You can set aside two 20 minute sessions a day. It’s like free drugs, it’s like free drugs.

Becky Robbins:
Yes, [inaudible 00:32:23]. You can also, if you do want to watch your Netflix shows, only let yourself watch two. Then do the 20 minutes. Then do the other two, but not until you’ve done the 20 minutes. Give yourself [crosstalk 00:32:33] some rewards. Then your brain will be happy to get a reward.

Jack Slattery:
Yeah, it’s great. I could keep talking about it. Okay.

Becky Robbins:
Yes.

Carole Freeman:
That’s one of the reasons why I’m doing this show, is that I want to show people that although our tendency is to be worried, and stressed out, and overwhelmed, we have choices right now.

Becky Robbins:
We do.

Carole Freeman:
We have the option to use this time to improve yourself, to do all those things that you always wanted to do but say you don’t have the time to do. How many of you that are watching have always thought, “Well, I’ve heard meditation is really good for me, but gosh, I just wish I had the time to do it.” So, I challenge you to start a meditation practice, and if you do, tell us in the comments you’re going to commit to that and come back and share with us what that experience was like.

Becky Robbins:
We just gave you too, one 20 minutes, one was what? Three to five minutes. I mean, anywhere in between. So many different styles. So, find what fits for you.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah. Jack, anything else to say about that? I’m going to share a mindful eating exercise with people.

Jack Slattery:
No, no. I think I got it all.

Carole Freeman:
Okay. Like you said, you could probably talk for hours and hours on it, but thank you so much for being here and sharing that and taking the time out of your terribly busy schedule right now. I love that you’re color coded for branding here. I appreciate that. So, I’m going to talk about mindful eating. Again, I’ll just introduce myself. I’m Carole Freeman. I’m a board certified ketogenic nutritionist. I, too, as well used to be a comedian back before the big cancellation of 2020. We’ll see. Things are going to be very different in the future here, and not to brag, but actually I’m booked on a show on Friday. A virtual show that we’re going to try to figure that out for some ladies. If it works, we may be rolling out some more. So, we’ll see. I don’t know.

Becky Robbins:
Excellent.

Carole Freeman:
Part of standup comedy, is you have to have an audience. You have to have live bodies that are laughing because there’s an energy exchange, and you ride that wave. There’s a reason why all Netflix specials have a live audience or recorded with an audience. There’s also a reason why 80s sitcoms either had a live audience or a laugh track. Things just aren’t as funny if we’re just telling them, but although I’ve got to say there’s some comedians that I know that are out there doing live every night and it’s like, “Oh, you’re still funny even if there’s no audience.” So, they got something.

Carole Freeman:
Anyway, so I am trained. I’ve got a master’s degree in nutrition and psychology. I’ve got a certification in clinical hypnotherapy. By day, I specialize, and now by night too, I specialize in helping people be able to follow ketogenic diet as a longterm lifestyle so that they can end the battle they’ve had their entire lives with their weight, lose the weight, and actually keep it off because they get the support and the approach that they need to actually be able to stick with it. So, I weave in everything I’ve ever studied psychology wise into my keto approach, and so it’s part of why it actually can be a sustainable lifestyle. It’s not only, how do you lose weight quickly, but how do you address all the things that make it so that most people can’t stick with something? So, we’re dealing with getting rid of cravings, natural regulation of appetite, and behavior change which can be really challenging too.

Carole Freeman:
So, one of the things that I learned when I was in school was this concept of mindful eating. I learned this long before I knew anything about a ketogenic diet, and we learned this concept. Now, the problem is is that it doesn’t work really well, so people that are in weight gain mode, their insulin is really high and their body is constantly storing everything they eat as fat. When insulin is high, it makes it so that their fat can’t come out of storage. So they’re constantly hungry, they have very low energy, and they’re constantly gaining weight. So unfortunately, society looks at them as, “Wow. Why don’t they just exercise more?” Or, “Why don’t they just have control over what they’re eating?”

Carole Freeman:
Anybody who’s ever battled with their weight, which is everybody that I’m working with, they know that they have a lot of willpower. They’ve tried every diet out there and every time they do, they’re constantly hungry, they’re so tired, they’re obsessed with food. When they do keto the right way for the first time, often it’s the first time they’ve ever experienced freedom. They’re not hungry. They’ve got tons of energy, and their body is able to actually let the fat out of storage so that they can get the fuel that they need. So, they get this glimpse of freedom. Usually the people I’m working with have tried keto on their own, they couldn’t stick with it, they couldn’t quite get it right but they have a glimmer of hope that, “Oh my gosh. This is the first time in my life that I felt this freedom.”

Carole Freeman:
I found that when I applied the things that I learned, like mindful and intuitive eating, once people are already in the state of their body could actually use its own fuel that it’s been storing for decades, then these concepts work beautiful. If you tell somebody that’s in weight gain mode, they’re still burning carbs, their body is storing everything they eat, you tell them to eat mindfully, I’ll tell you what that is in a moment, it doesn’t work very well. So I’ll tell you my results. Mindful eating. My brain things of things in systems, and processes, and checklists, and outlines. So for me, the way I always thought of mindfulness is it has three different parts.

Carole Freeman:
It needs to be, you’re in this moment right now. I mean, right now. There’s no past, there’s no future. It’s just what’s happening right now. The second one is there’s no judgment. There’s no right, wrong, good, or bad. It’s just is. Whatever is happening just is. Then the third part of it is you’re in full awareness of your body in the moment. I’ve got a way of helping you get into that moment as well, so mindful eating then is that you’re making a choice right now in the moment of what to eat, and as you eat it, you experience it without judgment. Full of awareness of how it tastes and feels in your body as you consume it. So mindful eating, for the people that I’m working with again, once they’re in that ketogenic state and they’re able to actually tune in to, “When am I really hungry? When am I not hungry? When I’m eating, I’ve had enough when I’m satisfied and I can actually stop eating when I’m full.” This is where mindful eating is really, really powerful.

Carole Freeman:
So, a way of bringing yourself into a mindful state is what I’ve found and what I’ve learned works well for the people that I’ve worked with is to begin, and this actually overlaps with the hypnotic state as well, is to bring in all of your senses. So to help yourself be in this present moment right now without judgment, and to use all of your senses with full awareness, is to just think about the five senses that we have and then mentally check them off. Okay, so right now what do I smell? What do I see around me? All the colors and shapes of everything around me. What do I feel? Whether you’re sitting, you’re standing, on your feet. What do I hear? Right now I hear my cat sleeping down there snoring. I hear my own voice. I hear the fan in my computer. I hear a little bit of background noise from Becky and Jack. I think that’s all I hear.

Carole Freeman:
Taste is your fifth sense. Right now, there’s whatever the taste of my mouth, but as you’re eating food you’re going to be noticing, how does it taste? How does it feel in your mouth? How does it crunch? Doing this exercise can be really, really powerful with food because a lot of times people are eating foods that they just think are good, that they’ve always eaten, but they’re not actually conscienscious when they’re eating it to find out, does it actually even taste good? Do you like what you’re eating? I am a big advocate for don’t eat any food that you don’t like. Now, the coaching I do with keto, there’s definitely foods that taste really good to us that I encourage people to avoid, but also within the keto parameters, if there’s a food that’s a keto friendly food but you don’t like it, don’t ever eat it. Also if there’s a keto friendly food like steak, or bacon, or cheese as long as it works well for your body, it tastes good, it makes your body feel good, go for it.

Carole Freeman:
There’s sensory input that we have as humans, actually, from foods that don’t taste good or have a bad reaction in our mouth. It can mean that there’s a nutrient in there that you’ve received too much of that you don’t need any more of. So, animals actually have this wisdom. There’s no deer nutritionist out there. Deer go out in the wild, and they can eat the right amount of leaves and grass, they eat the ones that have the nutrients that they need. They don’t have any Jillian Michaels out there telling them to run 10 miles a day. “Well, you need to eat four cups of these greens, and then you need to eat four more cups of these, and that’s how you get all your nutrients met.” No. They taste and they eat and their body tells them, “That tastes good. Eat more of that. That tastes bad. Don’t eat any more of that.”

Carole Freeman:
So, humans have moved far away from that. Part of that is because most of our food is so overly processed, and refined, and hybridized, and high in sugar and fat and all this stuff together that makes it override all of our natural abilities. When we get back to real, natural food the way that is closest to the way that it’s grown, our body is really good at telling us what we need and don’t need, food wise. So, I’m giving you permission right now as a nutritionist, and again we’re not medical doctors, we’re not prescribing anything. Even me as a healthcare provider, I’m not telling you personally what you should do, but this is what I tell my clients. I’ll put that caveat, is that if there’s a food that you don’t like and you’ve been eating it because you think it’s good for you, I’m making a recommendation. I’m giving you permission right now to stop eating that. Stop eating it. If you don’t like spinach, don’t eat it ever again.

Carole Freeman:
Also, yeah. Foods that you do like that are healthy, whole foods, go ahead and enjoy that food. Especially if you can eat it in a mindful way. One of the big ones for the clients I’m working with is cheese. A lot of people tell me, “Oh, I can’t stop eating cheese. I love cheese. I feel so bad, I could never stop it,” but I’ll tell you what. Everybody who has had that struggle, I say, “I’ll give you an assignment. I want you for the next 24 hours, I want you to go and try to eat as much cheese as you possibly can,” right? They go, “Oh, no. I would eat so much. I would never be able to stop.” Never [inaudible 00:44:14].

Becky Robbins:
No.

Carole Freeman:
[inaudible 00:44:16] I’m going to try to eat as much cheese as possible, they’ll get tired of it. So, most people because they tell themselves it’s bad for them, then they put a limit on it. They’re like, “Oh, I can’t have very much. I can eat it.” So then they obsess about it because they can’t have it. So, I challenge you. Also, some people don’t do well with cheese. It doesn’t agree with them. So this is part of the exercise, right? So if you’re eating cheese, maybe it tastes good here, but as it goes down it causes you some discomfort and pain. That’s mindful eating. You know that it doesn’t feel good in your body. Oh, Jack’s got a-

Jack Slattery:
I just wanted to break in with this. Johnathan C ate a 500 gram block of cheddar cheese in three minutes, 56 seconds. It’s a competitive sport, cheese eating, and that’s about a pound of cheese. So, that’s the world record right now, is a pound.

Becky Robbins:
A pound.

Carole Freeman:
Okay, well that’s good.

Becky Robbins:
That’s a lot.

Carole Freeman:
He wasn’t eating mindfully, but also just a pound of cheese is not that much cheese.

Jack Slattery:
Right.

Becky Robbins:
He probably didn’t feel good afterwards.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah. For people who think they could never stop, I’m sure that that guy probably didn’t want cheese for a month after [crosstalk 00:45:30].

Becky Robbins:
Uh-huh (affirmative), right.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah.

Becky Robbins:
Thank you.

Carole Freeman:
If all you ate during the day was a pound of cheese, it’s not even going to be that many calories either. So, I challenge everyone watching this whether you’re following keto or not, is the next time that you sit down to any meal, whatever it is you’re eating, for those of you not keto or stress eating or whatever, this is actually an exercise I used to do with my clients before keto. Most junk foods out there, they’re specifically designed that they only taste good if you eat them fast, mindlessly.

Becky Robbins:
Damn.

Carole Freeman:
So, those of you out there out in the world that are eating Doritos, I challenge you right now. Eat it slow and mindfully. I used to do this exercise as a group with my clients. If you sit with full awareness and notice everything around you, and you put that Dorito in your mouth and you bite down slowly and you chew slowly, and you notice how it tastes in your mouth and you notice the texture, it tastes horrible. It doesn’t taste good at all. It tastes like cardboard. The chip quality is the worst quality ever. The flavors don’t taste good. It tastes like cardboard in your mouth and you’re like, “Why did I think these tasted good?” It’s because they’re designed, they only taste good if you eat them fast. They do that on purpose so that you will overeat them.

Becky Robbins:
That’s why the bag says, “You can’t eat just one.”

Carole Freeman:
Yeah. Oh, that’s the Lay’s one. That’s also the same thing.

Becky Robbins:
That’s different. Yeah.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah. So, most junk food is meant to taste good if you eat it really, really fast but if you slow down and eat it slowly and mindfully, most of it doesn’t taste good at all in that context. So, if anybody is interested in more information about this, there’s a book out there called the Dorito Effect. We’ve all got time now to read or an audio book or something like that. Check that out. Again, any meal that you’re going to eat, I challenge you. Can you do it once in the next week? How about every meal that you do from now on? Just start out by centering yourself and noticing, bring in all five senses. This present moment, there’s no judgment. Whatever you’re eating right now, and just see. What do you notice about how it actually tastes, about how it actually makes you feel in your body? Very interesting.

Carole Freeman:
So, I look forward to hearing from all of you about doing this experiment, about what you’ve discovered about foods that you thought you really liked and let go, foods maybe you’re eating stress eating wise right now that you realize, “Wow. Actually, this is just shoving something in my face as fast as possible, and it’s not that it actually tastes good.” So, then you could be empowered then to actually make those choices of, what can you eat right now that actually tastes really good when you slow down and enjoy it? Those usually aren’t going to be junk food items. They’re going to be foods that are actually nutritious to your body. So, I challenge you. Eat foods that taste good when you eat slowly and savor every bite and morsel. All right, that’s my little bit.

Becky Robbins:
Thank you.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah. Typically, I ask questions. So Jack, what questions do you have for Becky? I forgot to ask that part earlier. So, do you have questions for Becky or anything about what she talked about? I think [crosstalk 00:49:08] already did.

Jack Slattery:
Oh my god. [crosstalk 00:49:08] like this.

Carole Freeman:
What’s that?

Jack Slattery:
You’re just going to throw me under the bus like this?

Carole Freeman:
Yes, yes. We’ve got to comment on what she was doing anyway. As far as art therapy.

Jack Slattery:
Yeah. So, where do you like to go hiking? How long of a hike do you do?

Becky Robbins:
That depends.

Jack Slattery:
Do you talk during the hike, or is it a silent meditation kind of thing?

Becky Robbins:
Oh, are you talking about when I go with clients?

Jack Slattery:
Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Becky Robbins:
Okay. So, most client sessions are a soft hour, as we call it, with a few minutes at the end for scheduling and stuff. Thinking about that and driving and all of this, it’s usually urban hikes. Anywhere from Golden Gardens, St. Edward’s Park, Discovery Park, all these different areas. They could be just walking around a park. Sometimes it includes playing on the kids’ toys, big kids’ toys. So, most of those sessions are an hour, and people can sign up for longer sessions. Then those are definitely walk and talk. There are moments of silence, but then when I do the group ones, those ones can be longer and they involve a lot more stop and pause exercises, or even mindfulness games to sharpen your skills and senses, and then we sit and process it together.

Becky Robbins:
I did a sound bath once where I dropped individual people in different spaces. You sit over here, we go six feet away. Necessary not six feet, that’s today. Go 20 feet away, put the other person over there, and so however many in the group, we’re all a good distance away. Then sit and have this sound bath, listening to what we hear around us and noting it in a journal in a specific way. Then coming back after 15, 20 minutes is a good amount of time, and then just collect ourselves, have a little snack if we need it, and then talk about what we experienced. Then finish the hike and go back with our day. So, that’s a very rough sketch of how that might look. Those hikes could be a little further out. Might involve carpooling, but those are usually more group. They’re not therapy groups or the clients that I regularly have. Those would be your everyday people who want self growth and they want to experience more mindfulness and hiking. So, that’s how that goes.

Carole Freeman:
You could totally still do the hikes virtually, right? So, somebody goes on a walk someplace, you go on a walk, and then you just talk to each other on [crosstalk 00:52:05].

Becky Robbins:
You could. Yeah, and in this day and age of the virus I would say yes, I would do that, but typically it’s phone/device free. If somebody internationally wanted to go do this hike thing, we could totally do that for sure.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah. So, you could be COVID compliant and still do hike therapy with people.

Becky Robbins:
Yeah, exactly.

Carole Freeman:
Right now, yeah.

Becky Robbins:
Right now. Sign up.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah. Becky, do you have questions for Jack?

Becky Robbins:
Yes, I do have questions for Jack. So Jack, I was listening to you talk about how you usually do one a day, but two is optimal. When you’ve had your two day meditations, 20 minutes twice a day, have you noticed a significant difference, or a little difference? Have you ever had a really long streak of twice a day?

Jack Slattery:
I have. When I first started, I was very diligent about twice a day. I was still in college, I had time, especially in the summers. It was much easier. I think it’s an accumulative kind of thing. I don’t think if you start out doing one a day, and then you build up to two, I don’t know if you’ll notice a significant change right away, but I think if you stay on that path it will become more noticeable.

Becky Robbins:
Over time.

Jack Slattery:
I think over time.

Becky Robbins:
Yeah.

Jack Slattery:
It just develops, it just compounds on itself. The one you did earlier is warming up for your next one in a way. It’s like doing a stretch for your next one.

Becky Robbins:
Yeah, like toning.

Jack Slattery:
Yeah, just like toning. Yeah, exactly. So, I think it’s just, like I said before, ultimately just a practice thing like anything else. The more you do it, the better you’re going to be at it.

Becky Robbins:
Yeah. Repatterning.

Jack Slattery:
Which is a really weird way to talk about it, being better at it, which implies you can be bad at it.

Becky Robbins:
Right, yeah.

Jack Slattery:
Just improving yourself. Pushing yourself to not push yourself.

Becky Robbins:
Mm-hmm (affirmative), I know exactly what you mean. Those who are learning this will eventually be like, “Oh, that’s what they were talking about.” Thanks [crosstalk 00:54:40].

Carole Freeman:
This is so-

Becky Robbins:
I have a question for you.

Carole Freeman:
Oh, yes. Okay.

Becky Robbins:
So, it sounded to me like you were using mindfulness for mindful eating and ketogenic state of mind interchangeably, and I don’t know anything about keto anything, which is newbie. So, [crosstalk 00:54:58] what is a ketogenic state?

Carole Freeman:
Yeah. So, a ketogenic state. When we keep our carbohydrate intake low, that goes in our mouth, it forces our body into this ketogenic state. Ketosis is a state where there’s ketones present in the blood, which is a medical term, and the way that we get there is that we restrict the amount of carbohydrates we’re eating. So, our body has this backup plan. In nature, we’re not prevalent. Our body basically turns over to fat as its primary fuel source, and as a byproduct of using fat as a primary fuel, your body also makes these other molecules called ketones. It can use those as fuel as well. So in the absence of carbohydrates, then our body can also use ketones as fuel. So, the brain actually really loves ketones as fuel. It makes this nice, even state high alertness that people experience.

Carole Freeman:
Now, our bodies are really designed, way back when we didn’t have an abundance of high sugar garbage food, our bodies are designed to have metabolic flexibility. That means that whatever we ate, our body could burn whether it was fat or carbs, and in the absence of food we could turn to our body’s fat storage and use that for fuel. So, that’s metabolic flexibility. That’s the way the human body was designed to operate. Unfortunately over time where we’ve shifted, it’s a combination of things. We were told that fat was really bad for us to eat, that we should instead eat tons of carbohydrates. Then the food manufacturers responded by making a bunch of high carbohydrate refined foods. We’ve switched from the ability to have metabolic flexibility that whatever we ate, and there are some people in the world that still have this. It’s the minority of people out there unfortunately. People that are very active still or just genetically an anomaly. Maybe less than 5% of the population I think are like that, but they’ve never been overweight.

Becky Robbins:
That would be me. Sorry.

Carole Freeman:
They’re the people [crosstalk 00:57:09], “Oh man, they could just eat whatever.”

Becky Robbins:
That’s why I don’t know.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah, so you’re a genetic anomaly.

Becky Robbins:
Well.

Carole Freeman:
Because back in the day when you needed to be able to store fat in order to survive the famine, your type would not have made it.

Becky Robbins:
Nope.

Carole Freeman:
Now we look at you and we’re like, “Oh, you’re so lucky. How is it that you can’t gain weight?” So, that’s why the majority of the population is in this place of we’re all overweight. Why? Why do I have such weak [crosstalk 00:57:40]?

Becky Robbins:
Why?

Carole Freeman:
Our bodies are designed, so it’s a genetic mismatch right now or an evolutionary mismatch. The way that our food supply is, is really good at making us fat for the predominant people.

Becky Robbins:
Yeah, or feel crappy for the un-predominant people.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah. So, we’ve moved in this state of primarily eating carbohydrates and so if you mostly eat carbohydrates all of the time, your body is basically like, “Well, we don’t need to make all of this stuff in order to get the fat [crosstalk 00:58:11] and burn that. We never burn that. So, let’s just stop making all of that machinery. Let’s change the cell structure so that we don’t have it, be able to get the fat out of storage, and let’s just shove all that in the furnace and keep gaining weight.”

Becky Robbins:
Got it.

Carole Freeman:
So over time, your body shuts off all of the ability to even use fat for fuel. So it basically makes it so you’re dependent on constantly having carbohydrates, and our body doesn’t have a storage of carbohydrates. So if we’re running primarily on that, you have to constantly be eating those. You have to eat six, or seven, or eight times a day and constantly fuel. So, that’s why people typically, and they get beat up because they’re constantly hungry. They’ve got to eat all the time. They’re really low energy. They’re lethargic. They want to sit around and not do much. They don’t have the energy to exercise.

Becky Robbins:
Yeah.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah and so for people like that, that they don’t have metabolic flexibility, they’re stuck in carb burning mode, we have to shift. It’s a very dramatic shift of restricting carbohydrates. So basically, we shut off that fuel source. We’re like, “Body, you need to adapt. We need you to get back to knowing how to burn fat again.”

Becky Robbins:
Do it.

Carole Freeman:
The only way to do that, it’s like a drug detox. So, if you keep carbs coming in your body doesn’t ever shift back to learning how to use fat. So, we have to shut that off and unfortunately, what’s happened with people is it can take 18 to 24 months, or even longer, for the body to get really good and have that flexibility. Some people are never really able to gain, in fact most people, aren’t able to gain that metabolic flexibility back that they could occasionally have high carbs and then switch back into burning fat.

Becky Robbins:
It’s good to know and to have that expectation and understanding.

Carole Freeman:
Also, there’s the brain chemistry part of it as well. So, that’s also another complicated factor for things as well, so people have built up the brain chemistry and addiction to food that it wouldn’t matter if their body is metabolically flexible and can burn carbs or fat. If they’re addicted and as soon as they start to have carbs again they can’t stop eating them, that’s a whole other issue too. So, I address both of those. Yeah, so that-

Becky Robbins:
Thanks.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah, so that’s what ketosis is, and typically when people are in that state, when their body is primarily burning fat for fuel and they’ve got these ketones, they have got a steady energy state throughout the day, they have a very low appetite. They’re not obsessed with food, they don’t really have any cravings, and all of that. So a lot of people, actually everybody who’s ever been in ketosis says, “Oh my gosh. I just feel so much better in this state because of the mental clarity and energy,” but it’s not always necessarily an ideal state for everyone to be in all of the time, right? So, somebody who’s very lean, because it’s an appetite suppressant, it’s not a good idea for them necessarily to follow it because they don’t need to lose anymore fat on their body. That can be actually detrimental to health to have not enough fat on their body. Is that more than you ever wanted to know about it for now?

Becky Robbins:
Thank you. No, that’s great. I want to know all the more things. Another time. Thank you.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah, yes. There’s so much more out there. Well Jack, do you have any questions for me? You don’t have to.

Jack Slattery:
Are you going to book me once you get the shows get going again?

Carole Freeman:
Yes, yeah. [crosstalk 01:01:46] I had a wild idea today about how we might actually might be able to do online shows in this platform, if we have enough guests on here with good people that [inaudible 01:01:57].

Becky Robbins:
That sounds fun.

Carole Freeman:
Derek and I are going to work on that.

Jack Slattery:
Okay.

Carole Freeman:
So, yeah. Yeah.

Becky Robbins:
Budding comedian over here.

Carole Freeman:
You?

Becky Robbins:
Yes [crosstalk 01:02:08], me.

Carole Freeman:
This is weird because it’s backwards so I can’t even point to you.

Becky Robbins:
Right, yes. [crosstalk 01:02:14] I started improv and now I’m in love with it.

Carole Freeman:
There we go, there we go. I had to point the opposite way. Oh, well yeah. When comedy comes back to life, we’ll have to get you back out on the open mic stage then, yeah.

Becky Robbins:
Yeah.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah.

Becky Robbins:
Cool.

Carole Freeman:
Okay. Let’s wrap this up. Thank you all for being here. We do one last round, and I call it the lightning bolt round. This is actually how I close out my coaching calls too. So, each of us take a turn and share your aha, your takeaway, or whatever you want to say to wrap this up. Also, be sure to mention how people can contact you for your services or follow you on social media, or whatever that way too.

Becky Robbins:
Do you want to go in a little circle?

Carole Freeman:
You’re going first now, so.

Becky Robbins:
All right, okay. So again, my name is Becky Robbins. My business is Inner Phoenix Embodied Arts, and what I learned today is gosh, I really liked what you just said about the ketones and such. So, I’m going to explore that a little more and how that impacts me, and then from Jack, I want to check out your comedy as well as dip my toe into TM, transcendental meditation, a little bit. See if I can make it to 20 minutes with my ADD. So, how you can contact me if you would like to go on one of those group hikes for mindfulness, of you’re interested in being a therapy client, you can contact me at my website, which is HTTP:-

Carole Freeman:
Oh, [crosstalk 01:04:03].

Becky Robbins:
Okay. You don’t have to do that, but there’s no WW, so don’t do that. It’s InnerPhoenix.Wordpress.com, and my email address, a little bit different, is Becky@InnerPhoenix.net. There’s a story behind that, and then you can also find me, I have a Facebook page which is Inner Phoenix Embodied Arts, and I post some of the videos for the hikes and stuff there. So, thank you both and onto you, Jack.

Carole Freeman:
Cool, thank you.

Jack Slattery:
Yeah. Aha moment for me was learning about the hikes that you do, the group hikes. That sounds really cool, it seems really fun. I have to check that out. You can follow me on Instagram at JackSlatteryComedy, the spelling of the name is right down at the lower screen.

Carole Freeman:
That’s good.

Jack Slattery:
Yeah. This was a lot of fun, thank you. Carole, I had something but I’m blanking. I talked about me for a second. I was supposed to talk about you.

Carole Freeman:
No, no. No, you’re supposed to talk about you right now. Yeah.

Jack Slattery:
Okay.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah, no. You did great. Yeah, thank you so much for being here. My takeaway, my aha, I love the therapy that you’re doing. The fact that you can hike therapy. I’ve never heard of that. It’s amazing. It’s so great, I love it.

Becky Robbins:
Hike it out.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah. I thought this earlier, I didn’t say it, but I bet you’re just so happy in alignment with your true self right now compared to what you were doing before.

Becky Robbins:
Oh yeah.

Carole Freeman:
Yeah, yeah. That’s great. Thank you everyone for watching. The biggest compliment you could give is to invite other people to watch, to like the page, and come back. So, I’m doing this every single night, 7:00 PM Pacific. Yeah, this is going to be posted because in recording, we had some tech issues. Sorry about that. I don’t know what happened.

Becky Robbins:
It happens.

Carole Freeman:
I have no control over it, so I’m just going to me mindful in the moment. That’s what we did. We just did the best that we could in this moment, and let go of everything we can’t control, but thank you all for being here. We’re coming back, lots more good stuff coming up, so thanks for watching. We’ll see you all soon. Bye.

Becky Robbins:
Bye.

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