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Episode Description: 
Today is part 2 of our 10 part introductory series. Your host, Carole Freeman, board certified ketogenic nutrition specialist, and co-host Simon Kaufman, will be covering easy rule number 2 of how to get started, or restarted, on keto for max results.
This show gives you the tips and strategies for long-term keto sustainability that you just can’t get anywhere else!
So whether you have no idea what macros are, or you’ve watched every keto YouTube video out there, this show is for you!

Podcast Transcription:

Carole Freeman:

We’re live!

Simon Kaufman:

We’re live.

Carole Freeman:

Hey, welcome everyone. Oh man, what am I supposed to say? I almost forgot already. Oh. Hey, do you want to know the perfect amount of protein to start your keto diet for max results? Stick around because we’re going to tell you. Welcome to Keto Chat Live. I am your host, Carole Freeman, Board Certified Ketogenic Nutrition Specialist.

Simon Kaufman:

I’m Simon Kaufman, the ketogenic macro counter. How are you doing? I think that went very well.

Carole Freeman:

Okay. Well. [crosstalk 00:00:33] for this.

Simon Kaufman:

We know we’re good. No, no. We’re good.

Carole Freeman:

If you would share the medical disclaimer-

Simon Kaufman:

Oh, very important.

Carole Freeman:

We need to make sure that people know that this is just for entertainment. They’re not supposed to actually take action on anything we’re saying.

Simon Kaufman:

You call this entertainment?

Carole Freeman:

We’ll try.

Simon Kaufman:

Okay. This is very important. Are you sitting down everyone? This show is meant for educational and entertainment purposes only. It is not medical advice nor intended to diagnose, treat, cure any conditions. If you have any medical condition, illness, disease, or are taking any medications, please don’t listen to us. For questions or concerns related to any medical conditions you have, please contact your medical professional right away.

Carole Freeman:

Yes. Do that. Hang up. Hang up and call 911 as well. Hey, Carrie’s here. Hi Carrie Redmond Washington.

Simon Kaufman:

Aloha.

Carole Freeman:

What what what. All right. So question of the day everyone, how many grams of protein are you doing currently? Chime in, let us know where you’re at. So, how are you doing Simon?

Simon Kaufman:

I’m doing well. Thanks for asking.

Carole Freeman:

What’s new since the last show?

Simon Kaufman:

Oh man. A lot of things. Just doing my keto diet. I found that news article. Are we talking about that yet, or we’re not yet?

Carole Freeman:

Oh. Well, let’s just get up to speed with what’s been going on.

Simon Kaufman:

No, thanks-

Carole Freeman:

I heard you’re your intermittent fasting today.

Simon Kaufman:

I am. I’m intermittent fasting. I’m going to break it as soon as we’re done with this. So, that’s cool. I booked my first comedy gig since COVID destroyed the planet.

Carole Freeman:

What?

Simon Kaufman:

It’s May 8th, I’ll be performing live again as long as a asteroid doesn’t take us all out.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, that’s probably going to happen. So at least you tried, right?

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah. So yeah, I’m back at it and yeah.

Carole Freeman:

Yes. Carrie, check with your mental health professional, seek help as appropriate. Knowing her that’s probably what would be best. She’s a good friend of mine. That’s all [crosstalk 00:02:38]

Simon Kaufman:

Oh, is she?

Carole Freeman:

Yeah. Yep.

Simon Kaufman:

Okay, good. Good.

Carole Freeman:

So, you’re intermittent fasting, meaning like between bites of food, you’re not eating. Is that what you’re doing?

Simon Kaufman:

Yes, I am in-the-mitten fasting. I put the food in my mitten and I carry it around with me-

Carole Freeman:

In the mitten.

Simon Kaufman:

… then I take the food out of my mitten and I eat it.

Carole Freeman:

Dude, write a book. That’s it. Bestseller.

Simon Kaufman:

No, I take my mittens and I just eat the food. It’s good.

Carole Freeman:

It makes sense. It’s going to be so much harder, right? Because you got to pick stuff up. You can’t really cut stuff. It definitely would cut down on your eating.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah, yeah. Using mittens really can cut down on that.

Carole Freeman:

Well, and especially if you put the food in the mitten and then put your hands on it.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah. Very important. In-the-mitten fasting.

Carole Freeman:

There’s actually a lot of different forms of in-the-mitten fasting.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah. That’s true. Is this helpful people? Are you finding this helpful?

Carole Freeman:

Please let us know.

Simon Kaufman:

Maybe this is why you’re supposed to contact the medical board and not listen to us.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, yes. Thanks, Carrie, for that recommendation. Yes. Neither of us are denying that we may need mental health support ourselves.

Simon Kaufman:

Yes. If you’re on any medication, please share. No?

Carole Freeman:

With a disclaimer, caveat that there may be people that see it. This is not private. Have you ever had people like that, that they don’t understand that things that are online, on social media, on YouTube, they aren’t private? I’ve had some interactions in my life with people like that, that are like, “Why did you share that? That was private. I put it on my Facebook.”

Simon Kaufman:

That’s hilarious. Yeah. I don’t know. Yeah, no.

Carole Freeman:

No?

Simon Kaufman:

Not sure.

Carole Freeman:

Okay.

Simon Kaufman:

But there’s been all these crazy news articles coming out since the pandemic of people that are on Zoom calls and then next thing you know, they think they’re off and they start doing really inappropriate things and then, “Okay, you’re fired.”

Carole Freeman:

Yes. They think they blocked themselves off and then they don’t have any pants on or something like that.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah. They stand up but like, whoa. Okay. All right. That’s why I don’t stand up in the show. You can tell.

Carole Freeman:

All right. Well, what’s in your glass today, Simon?

Simon Kaufman:

What’s in my glass? It’s a decaf coffee.

Carole Freeman:

Okay.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah.

Carole Freeman:

I’ve got a generic sparkling flavored water, black cherry.

Simon Kaufman:

Nice. That’s great. So Carole, how many grams of protein are you doing now?

Carole Freeman:

Ooh, that’s a good question. I tend to do well somewhere close to a hundred grams of protein, actually, and this is through trial and error. When I’m tracking, measuring, no less than 80 for me personally. I find that I do much better closer to a hundred, and that’s what topic we’re going to get into a little bit later, which some people may be like, “That’s too much protein. That’s going to turn into sugar.” It’s not true, but yeah. Have you tracked to the point? Do you have any idea how many grams of protein in your…

Simon Kaufman:

Okay, this is what happens. I’ll start, I’ll wake up in the morning, I’ll track my first meal, and then that’s it. I forget for the rest the day.

Carole Freeman:

Well, episode number four. Tune in for episode four, we’re going to talk about why… Well, I’m not going to give it away, it’s a secret. Something related to that of why that’s rule number four to follow.

Simon Kaufman:

Oh, okay.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah. Say, too. Simon, you should come back for episode four.

Simon Kaufman:

I hope to be here, as long as I don’t get fired.

Carole Freeman:

Right now, we’re on a show-to-show contract, and think we’re going well.

Simon Kaufman:

So far so good.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah. We had some good reviews after last episode. So let us know what you think.

Simon Kaufman:

Did we really? That’s nice. I could use a few good reviews these days?

Carole Freeman:

Yeah. Yeah. So, send us your review of the show and we’ll read it on air.

Simon Kaufman:

That’s right.

Carole Freeman:

If you’re randomly selected.

Simon Kaufman:

Cool.

Carole Freeman:

All right.

Simon Kaufman:

All right.

Carole Freeman:

Well, you want to talk about that news article?

Simon Kaufman:

I would.

Carole Freeman:

Okay.

Simon Kaufman:

Hot and sexy right off the bat.

Carole Freeman:

You would? Well, so if you listened last week, this article, it just came out February 23rd, 2021. This really got my attention because Simon shared last week that one of his top reasons for having an interest in a ketogenic diet is family history of Alzheimer’s, and here we’ve got her random crossover trial that looked exactly at that ketogenic diet for seeing how it affects people with Alzheimer’s. So, this is a landmark study because this is the first randomized controlled trial that looks at a keto diet in Alzheimer’s. So this is pretty exciting. Let me give you some highlights here of this.

Simon Kaufman:

So, wait. Hold on a second. Timeout, back up. Why had they not done this up until this point? The randomized controlled killer crossover trial?

Carole Freeman:

Let me see. It mentions that here. Let me find that really quickly.

Simon Kaufman:

Because I know for a long time, there was a lot of studies that were coming out and they were in favor of keto and people were saying, “Well, it’s not enough. It’s not enough.” I guess I don’t understand all that. What’s the difference between this one versus what they had in the past?

Carole Freeman:

What do you mean, what they had in the past or what do they just recommend in general?

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah. Because there’s other studies. There’s other studies out there before that said you should go ketogenic, but what changed? Is this is just like more hardcore? It’s like more randominized or whatever?

Carole Freeman:

So, I found the part in the article that says prior to this article being published, there were only two clinical trials that examined the effects of a ketogenic diet on Alzheimer’s.

Simon Kaufman:

Okay.

Carole Freeman:

So one of them was a single arm study, which means there was just one group of people. They had them following a keto diet for 12 weeks.

Simon Kaufman:

The people only had one arm?

Carole Freeman:

That’s where the controversy came in, is because they’re like, “Well, what about people with two arms? How does it affect them?

Simon Kaufman:

What about people with two arms?

Carole Freeman:

Yeah.

Simon Kaufman:

You eat just protein if you only have one arm? All right, nevermind.

Carole Freeman:

Well, based on body weight. So yeah, probably.

Simon Kaufman:

So, that was the single arm and now, what?

Carole Freeman:

Well, so what people said the problem with that one is there was no controls. So, it’s hard to know exactly if the effects they saw would be true of other people or what.

Simon Kaufman:

Sometimes I feel I have no control. All right. Continue. Sorry.

Carole Freeman:

Well, in that single arm study, the people had improvements in their cognitive scores, but again, the lack of a control meant that they couldn’t rule out that the changes weren’t from other factors. Right.

Simon Kaufman:

Aw, and that’s the placebo. The control.

Carole Freeman:

Yes. Yeah. Yeah.

Simon Kaufman:

Got it.

Carole Freeman:

Then the other study that’s been done to date was a ongoing randomized controlled trial that’s provided preliminary data on the impact of a 12 week modified Atkins. So, modified Atkins basically is a little more lenient, a little bit higher carb allowance than a true ketogenic diet. Let’s see. So in that trial, the most adherent patients had improvements of the memory score, but overall adherence was only fair and function didn’t improve. So if they’re not actually sticking with it, then of course things aren’t going to improve there. So, that’s the only other one. Those are the only other two studies have been done to date.

Carole Freeman:

This is the first crossover randomized controlled trial. Crossover study means that they split the people into two groups. For awhile, one of them followed a ketogenic diet, the other one followed a low fat diet. Then they had what’s called a washout period for 10 weeks. They had them go back to their regular diet, and then they switched. So then the group that had followed the keto diet followed the low fat diet for 12 weeks and vice versa, that way they served as their own control so they could see the changes and the improvements or decline in each person, comparing the two diets to each person.

Simon Kaufman:

And most people followed it, yeah?

Carole Freeman:

Yeah. Yeah. That was one of the things that was the most remarkable about this study was adherence was really high, which means they were able to stick with it, as well as retention, meaning people didn’t fall out of the study because they didn’t for whatever reason. Also it was safe, so there weren’t any bad health outcomes that happened as well. This is really important-

Simon Kaufman:

Sounds like what you’re saying is the diet works better when you actually stick to it.

Carole Freeman:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yeah.

Simon Kaufman:

Okay, that’s good. Everyone write that down. You have to actually do the diet for it to work.

Carole Freeman:

Yes. That’s-

Simon Kaufman:

We’re very helpful.

Carole Freeman:

It’s a big thing when I run into people say like, “Oh, I tried keto. It didn’t work for me.” That’s usually because they weren’t actually doing it correctly. That’s part of why we’re doing this 10 part series to let people know here’s the 10 things should follow to do it the right way.

Simon Kaufman:

I tried it in the morning, but by the afternoon it didn’t work for me.

Carole Freeman:

Yes. Yeah. Yeah. So, those factors of the good things are really important because a lot of the criticism of encouraging anyone to follow a keto diet for health improvements is that, “Well, it’s too hard. Nobody likes to eat that way. Oh, it’s not safe. Bad things are going to happen.” But, this research study showed that none of those were true. Then everyone that was following a ketogenic diet, they had improvements in their activities of daily living, basically their ability to do their own just basic skills that we all need to do to take care of ourselves during the day. Also, their quality of life improved as well. So, pretty cool. Very exciting. There’s a book written by my friend, Amy Berger. It’s on the floor back there somewhere, called the Alzheimer’s Antidote, too. She’s got a lot more information about the other studies that have been done, but just the research in general.

Simon Kaufman:

Does Amy know you put her book on the floor?

Carole Freeman:

It’s not a religious text. So probably, she doesn’t mind. There is a book called The Ketogenic Bible. I didn’t put that on the floor. But that-

Simon Kaufman:

No, never.

Carole Freeman:

No.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah.

Carole Freeman:

Just a little bit of background of why this is helping and working is that Alzheimer’s or dementia has been called type 3 diabetes or diabetes of the brain, and imaging of the brain as well as tissue samples show that basically, there’s insulin resistance going on in the brain and the cells are not able to get glucose. So, their primary fuel. The brain cells are starved of fuel and energy to do their functioning. Ketones are an alternate fuel source that brain cells can use, and by eating a diet that promotes a production of ketones, it basically gives the brain a different fuel source that it’s able to use.

Simon Kaufman:

Wow. Okay.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah.

Simon Kaufman:

But you have to stick to it.

Carole Freeman:

Well, yes. Yes.

Simon Kaufman:

That’s good. Okay. Maybe that’s my problem. Maybe that’s my problem.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah. Truthfully that is the biggest challenge of making dietary change is doing it in a way that you can stick with for the rest of your life. Anybody can follow anything for a short period of time, but figuring out the quality of life part of it and the psychology side of why we eat what we eat is a big part of the work that I do.

Simon Kaufman:

Great. All right.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah. Any other-

Simon Kaufman:

That’s really exciting.

Carole Freeman:

Any other questions about that?

Simon Kaufman:

Who did the study?

Carole Freeman:

That’s good.

Simon Kaufman:

Was it a university or was it just some guys in a trailer?

Carole Freeman:

Oh, it’s Breaking Bad staff. That’s who did it.

Simon Kaufman:

Is that it? Yeah.

Carole Freeman:

This was published in Alzheimer’s Research Therapy published February 23rd, 2021, and it’s a bunch of people’s names. I don’t recognize any of those names as far as like, these are keto people or anything like that. Let me see. Usually at the end, they’ve got like funding and stuff. Let’s see if I can find anything about that.

Simon Kaufman:

It’s no big deal if you don’t have it. I was just curious if was like-

Carole Freeman:

Researchers, publisher’s note. Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims. I don’t know what that’s about. Oh, here we go. Competing interests. The authors of this trial report no conflicts of interest. DKJM, I don’t know what that is, runs a whole foods coaching business. However, none of her recipes were used in this trial. All recipes were obtained from sources with no personal or financial affiliation to any of the authors. Basically, it looks like the meal plans were provided by somebody that does whole food coaching.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah. Kind of like somebody that puts out the food and they’re like, “Oh, look, my food’s great. Go figure. Buy more.”

Carole Freeman:

It’s not even food supply company. It’s just somebody who teaches people how to eat regular whole foods.

Simon Kaufman:

Oh, okay.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah.

Simon Kaufman:

I learned how to eat when I was a child.

Carole Freeman:

Did you?

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah.

Carole Freeman:

Is that where you learned the in-the-mitten fasting?

Simon Kaufman:

In-the-mitten fasting, yeah. I still do it. I still pretend my pudding is an airplane and open wide. It’s good. It just makes life fun.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah. You got to have fun and entertain yourself while you’re eating. Pudding gets pretty boring, so yeah. All right.

Simon Kaufman:

I can’t believe you just called pudding boring.

Carole Freeman:

It’s got so lack of texture.

Simon Kaufman:

It’s not keto, unless it is.

Carole Freeman:

Well, the most keto pudding that’s out there is mayonnaise.

Simon Kaufman:

Sure. I’ve done that, just late at night.

Carole Freeman:

My son’s favorite kind of pudding is mayonnaise, actually.

Simon Kaufman:

What, he just eats a thing of mayonnaise?

Carole Freeman:

Oh, he will. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah.

Simon Kaufman:

No. No. No. No.

Carole Freeman:

Yes.

Simon Kaufman:

He just eats mayonnaise out of the jar?

Carole Freeman:

Oh, he loves it. Yeah.

Simon Kaufman:

That can’t be healthy.

Carole Freeman:

He’s sick. He’s sick.

Simon Kaufman:

That’s sick. Yeah. The good news about if you just eat mayonnaise from the jar, at least you’ll be alone. Nobody wants to be around you, so no one can say anything.

Carole Freeman:

I think he got it from my mother. She always loved mayonnaise as well. I don’t get it. He didn’t get it from me.

Simon Kaufman:

Who raised you, Carole?

Carole Freeman:

Who raised me? Oh, who raised him? I didn’t teach him about eating mayonnaise out of a jar. He just-

Simon Kaufman:

Oh, wow. Okay. A disclaimer. We’re not advising that. Okay. This is good. This is informative. All right, what else we got?

Carole Freeman:

Well, you know what? Let’s get onto the meat of this show. This episode is all about easy rule number two, how to get started on keto, or restarted, for maximum results. Today’s topic is protein. Okay. This is such a controversial… Okay. Last week we talked about 20 grams of total carbs. Okay. Not controversial but also, this protein episode, I know it’s going to be controversial. But I promise you, I have studied this and I’ve implemented this in my clients for the last six years, hundreds and hundreds of hundreds of mostly women. I’ve studied the work of Dr. Ben Bikman, Bullock and Phinney, the Ketogains guys, and so this is something that has evolved over the last five years. But, it turns out that more protein is probably better.

Carole Freeman:

There’s a couple of different ways. I can tell people like a shortcut way of doing their protein. We’re talking about ketogenic diet in the context of weight loss and long-term fat loss, okay? So let’s just cover that first. We’re not talking about keto for epilepsy or brain cancer or anything like that. This is just in the context of sustainable weight loss. 60 grams of protein, pretty much for everybody, nobody should go less than that. I kind of do a quick and dirty, easy amount of protein for my women is somewhere between 60 to 80 grams. If they’re doing that as a minimum, that’s a really, really easy way of doing it. For people that like nerdy math equations, you can do the equation that I learned in school, and this is just a generic way of calculating humans protein needs, is that you convert your weight into kilograms. So, move to Canada or where else do they do the metric system first.

Simon Kaufman:

That sounds communist.

Carole Freeman:

That’s the first step, move to Canada. Convert to kilograms and then multiply that by 0.8. It’s a range, okay? So 0.8 to 1.0. Basically you can kind of start with… A really, really easy way is… Or, not as easy as 60 to 80, but another easy way is just your weight in kilograms is how many grams of protein to aim for per day. Kitty wants to sit on my lap. So for men, that’s usually going to be a little higher because their body weight’s a little bit higher. For the men that I work with, I usually have them a very easy, simple way of start with between 80 to 100 grams of protein per day.

Simon Kaufman:

Can you go over 100?

Carole Freeman:

You can go over. That’s the good news. Okay. I used to teach this, which I was wrong. We now know especially, again with the work of Dr. Ben Bikman, is that in the context of low carb eating, we don’t have to actually worry about getting too much protein. You can find lots of information out there that’s wrong out there, how if you eat too much protein, it just turns into glucose, and so you’ve got to be really, really careful about your protein. It turns out that that’s not the way that the body works. We can turn protein into glucose, but it’s only if we need to. If there’s no other substrates around and we need to make some glucose, we can make it out of protein. It’s what’s called “demand driven.” So if we need it, our body can make it, but it’s not because there’s extra sitting around that it just gets turned into glucose.

Simon Kaufman:

Okay. So, if you have enough ketones, it won’t need glucose.

Carole Freeman:

Exactly. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, so our liver can make glucose out of… It actually can make it out of the backbone of fat, fatty acids. Not fatty acids, but the backbone of fat and it can make it from amino acids. We only need a small amount of glucose in our blood when we’ve got ketones happening as well. Let’s say you ate 200 grams of protein in a day, Simon, your body’s not going to go, “Well, that’s too much protein, so I guess we’re just going to have to turn it into glucose.” It doesn’t work that way. Your body will actually increase your metabolism and burn more of that as one of the benefits. So not only do we not have to worry about going too high on protein, err on the side of more than less will actually give you a metabolic advantage. It actually takes more calories to process that extra protein than it does… So, you’re going to get actually to burn more calories the more protein you eat.

Simon Kaufman:

Okay.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah. In fact-

Simon Kaufman:

All right. Let’s eat up.

Carole Freeman:

This is the technique that bodybuilders have used for a long time to shred and get really lean as they do something called protein sparing modified fasting, where they keep carbs fairly low. Protein ends up being their body weight in grams, not even kilograms. Then the fat they keep really, really low, so then it forces their body to burn their own fat. People like Maria Emmerich have written a book about this, a keto cookbook about protein sparing modified fasting. We’ve got Dr. Ted Naiman also that talks about this as well, his protocol. I’ve done accelerator programs with my clients that show how to do this technique, very, very high protein as a way of actually boosting fat loss. Ketones, and I’ve tested myself in this and my ketones keep going up, because they’re being made from my own body’s body fat.

Carole Freeman:

In summary, really easy. Nobody should go less than 60 grams of protein a day. Women are going to do better, most of them, if they’re getting closer to 80 or higher. Men, I would recommend not going less than 80 and more is probably going to be better as well. Metabolic advantage. The other things, so protein helps with satiety as well. So, when we’re undereating protein and women are really… We fall into this a lot because protein foods are stereotypical man foods, right? Steak and sausage and bacon, those are man foods and women are supposed to eat salads and bread and laugh.

Simon Kaufman:

That’s sexist.

Carole Freeman:

When we’re undereating protein, we actually crave carbohydrates a lot more because our body needs something to fill that void. I’ve found over and over again, we’re prioritizing proteins. Each meal, think about what protein food you’re going to have first, have an adequate portion. This means you’re going to have to look up the portion size to get the right amount of grams of protein. But, you’re having that first. You’re going to get a lot less cravings. You’re going to have lower appetite than you would if you’re having a lower protein and higher carbon tank or even higher fat. The other benefit of prioritizing protein is that protein foods are actually really rich in vitamins and minerals. They naturally contain rich sources of vitamins and minerals that are the type that our body is most easily able to digest and assimilate, absorb, and all that. So protein foods should be your friend.

Simon Kaufman:

Nice. All right.

Carole Freeman:

What’s your favorite friend protein?

Simon Kaufman:

Potato chips. No, I’m joking.

Carole Freeman:

Are you friends with cows?

Simon Kaufman:

Is that an organization?

Carole Freeman:

Probably somewhere out there.

Simon Kaufman:

It’s like, Friends of Cows. Come donate to friends of cows. No, I love corned beef. Come on.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah.

Simon Kaufman:

Like, yeah. Yesterday I was thinking about going for St. Patrick’s Day to go get corned beef, but then I thought like, then everyone’s going to be there at the Irish restaurant. There’s one near me that has a really good corned beef and cabbage. It’s legit. Legit.

Carole Freeman:

Nice, nice. Oh man. You make homemade corned beef too, right?

Simon Kaufman:

Hey. For the right people.

Carole Freeman:

What’s your secret?

Simon Kaufman:

Would you like to be my homemade corned beef friend? No, I don’t know. I just look online [crosstalk 00:25:29]

Carole Freeman:

I’ve had… So, what’s the-

Simon Kaufman:

… I make it on the stove top a lot or I’ll make it in a Crock-Pot.

Carole Freeman:

What’s the difference between corned beef and brisket?

Simon Kaufman:

The cooking. The way you cook it and prepare it. Corned beef is like, pickled.

Carole Freeman:

Oh, okay. It’s like marinated for days or brined?

Simon Kaufman:

No, you just hit it with a pickle.

Carole Freeman:

Okay.

Simon Kaufman:

You hang it, and then someone comes by and just whacks it with a pickle. No, I know what pickled means. But yeah, no, it has to do with brine, something like that. The way it’s pickled and brined.

Carole Freeman:

Pickled usually means like a salty, vinegary solution.

Simon Kaufman:

Sure. That.

Carole Freeman:

Okay.

Simon Kaufman:

That’s what it is. Yeah.

Carole Freeman:

Have you ever even made it or you just like to eat it?

Simon Kaufman:

I just wanted to impress you, Carole.

Carole Freeman:

I’m sorry. Write in, support Simon everyone. He needs your love and approval now.

Simon Kaufman:

Ah, that’s true. So yeah, no, I like corned beef. Brisket is really good. There’s some places in New York City. Oh, my God. When I lived in the lower east side, there was this place. It was a hole in the wall. You would not ever think this would be a good restaurant. Like, sawdust on the floor, guy in a counter, and it was the most delicious thing you’ve had.

Carole Freeman:

Sounds like a Seinfeld episode. Right?

Simon Kaufman:

Well, it was good.

Carole Freeman:

That’s always the best food, is always a place like, “Oh God, I don’t even know if they passed their health inspection here.”

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah, probably not. No. Yeah, in New York they put your score out on the front of the restaurant.

Carole Freeman:

Oh, yeah. Nice. But if the food’s good enough, you’ll pass an F anyways, right? Like, “Eh, they only got a D but that pickle brine’s going to kill off all the germs anyways.”

Simon Kaufman:

E, F. It reminds me of my school days. It makes me feel at home. It’s good.

Carole Freeman:

Nice.

Simon Kaufman:

So what else?

Carole Freeman:

All right. Well, I don’t have anything else. Anybody have any comments or questions here of our viewers? Otherwise we can wrap this up for today.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah. Then what about next week? What have we got coming down the-

Carole Freeman:

Oh, you guys. Come back next week. Next episode is going to be rule number three. To get started with keto the easy way for best results, we’re going to talk all about fat. If you thought protein was controversial, wait till we talk about how much fat should you actually have on a keto diet. That’s next episode.

Simon Kaufman:

You’re not going to talk about my fat specifically, are you?

Carole Freeman:

I’m not to look-

Simon Kaufman:

That’d be a little embarrassing.

Carole Freeman:

This is about how much fat you should put in your mouth.

Simon Kaufman:

Oh, okay. Perfect.

Carole Freeman:

I’m not going to make any recommendations of any of our viewers or listeners to how much of your fat they should eat. Have you been ever been told that you’re like… What’s that saying about somebody who full of hot air and bloated? Like a blowhard, a blubbering idiot? Have you ever been called that?

Simon Kaufman:

Called a blow hard? Well, you just almost did in a roundabout way, so I see what you did there.

Carole Freeman:

We’re workshopping this. All right. That’s what we promised. We figured out the best chemistry for a show, just like reality shows. You got to have some fighting and flirting. That’s the recipe.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah. You just have to insult me.

Carole Freeman:

I’m trying to give you some backhanded compliments. Simon, I’d never call you a blubbering idiot or a blowhard.

Simon Kaufman:

Well, thank you, Carole. So yeah, people. Subscribe to the YouTube channel and get notified when the next episode comes out.

Carole Freeman:

Oh. Well, and let me summarize too. So today, I talked all about protein. Really quick down and dirty, don’t go below 60, somewhere 80 or 100 is probably better for you. Lots of reasons why. If you forgot, well, rewind and listen to this again.

Simon Kaufman:

Nice. Okay. So yeah, subscribe to the YouTube channel, check it out. You’ll get notified when things drop. You can check us out live 5:00 PM every Thursday Pacific. Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Carole Freeman:

All right. Yeah. Hey, thanks for listening. Thanks for watching everyone. We’ll see you next time.

Simon Kaufman:

Bye.

Carole Freeman:

Bye.

Notes:

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