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Episode Description: 

Today’s episode is part 5 in our 10 part series of the 10 Rules to follow to get started (or restart) on keto to get max results. We cover rule #5 today, and frankly, if you don’t do this rule, nothing else will work!

Podcast Transcription:

Carole Freeman:

When we do our check in, you can share about the … Oh, the big announcement. Hey everybody, welcome back to another episode. Hey, do you want to know the number one reason people fail on keto? That’s what we got for you today. If you don’t do this one thing, this one thing, you’re probably never going to get Peter to work for you. So stick around and we’re going to talk about it. So welcome, welcome.

Simon Kaufman:

It tends to be a failure failure.

Carole Freeman:

It does, just in general in life, you’re just going to never be able to amount to anything, okay.

Simon Kaufman:

I like how hardcore you get, no, you’re right. We have to just like yeah-

Carole Freeman:

Double down, double down.

Simon Kaufman:

You have no hope at anything. I love when you are too harsh.

Carole Freeman:

In improv you say, yes and, podcasting I think it’s, no, never and not ever. I don’t know, double down on the negative. I don’t know.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah, people like to see the fight, point-counterpoint. You’re like, “Be keto.” I’m like, “No.” Okay.

Carole Freeman:

Where are LIVE, Simon, they’d love to see the love.

Simon Kaufman:

All right, here we go.

Carole Freeman:

All right. We’re public on all the channels. So all our tuners in-ers are going to be here real soon. So, hey, everyone. Welcome to Keto Chat LIVE. I’m your host, Carole Freeman.

Simon Kaufman:

I’m Simon Kaufman. I’m sorry, I cut you off. Okay, start that again.

Carole Freeman:

I was going to say why I have all these fancy letters after my name and why I have six figures in student loans.

Simon Kaufman:

Okay, yeah, tell them why.

Carole Freeman:

I’m going to pay on these loans for the rest of my life. I need to say these letters. That’s the only good they do really.

Simon Kaufman:

I feel you earned the ability to say the letters.

Carole Freeman:

Let me say all of them. So MS, I have a master’s in nutrition and clinical health psychology, Washington State, I have a CN which is a certified nutritionist I can put after my name. I also am a certified clinical hypnotherapist, so I can put CHT after my name, and the big fancy one that I like the most that wasn’t the most expensive one actually. That was the board certified ketogenic nutrition specialist. So hey, I got to squeeze all the clout I can’t out of the crippling debt that I got from going to school.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah, what did I do?

Carole Freeman:

Nancy’s here.

Simon Kaufman:

Hey.

Carole Freeman:

Well, you don’t have to pay $1,000 a month of student loans forever. That’s one good thing.

Simon Kaufman:

I did a three part course on massage once.

Carole Freeman:

Oh, yeah?

Simon Kaufman:

Like for three weeks, does that count?

Carole Freeman:

Yeah. Did you get a certificate?

Simon Kaufman:

No.

Carole Freeman:

Or did you not go to the test?

Simon Kaufman:

No.

Carole Freeman:

How about Tantra? Did you study-

Simon Kaufman:

Oh, I didn’t get a certificate. You’re right. [crosstalk 00:02:39] Okay, there you are.

Carole Freeman:

Look at you, you forgot already?

Simon Kaufman:

Well, I’m kind of a big deal. So all right.

Carole Freeman:

All right. We got to-

Simon Kaufman:

You did all your letters after you-

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, I did. I did. Yeah, I mean, well, if you count like the Freeman, F-R-E-E-M-A-N. My name has a lot of Es. My middle name is Lee, L-E-E.

Simon Kaufman:

Really?

Carole Freeman:

Have you ever reserved books? This is totally off topic, but it’s letters. And have you ever reserved a book at the library? Books, things you read? Like have you ever looked at those?

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah, I have a library card. Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Carole Freeman:

I don’t know if they’re open or not [crosstalk 00:03:22] You have it on you? That’s amazing.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah. I like to impress people with my library card.

Carole Freeman:

Well, it’s more clout you’ve got.

Simon Kaufman:

Some people use a black Amex, not me. I used a library card.

Carole Freeman:

In Pike county library card.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah.

Carole Freeman:

It’s impressive.

Simon Kaufman:

I mean, you don’t let me within 50 yards of the building because of a little snafu incident that happened but I still got the card, no, it’s a joke.

Carole Freeman:

Is it kind of like blockbuster fees? You have somebody library fines that they won’t let you step put in more?

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah. No, those are all paid. I’m good. I’m golden.

Carole Freeman:

Good.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah. Tell your friends, Simon’s paid up.

Carole Freeman:

Simon’s a responsible library user, that’s great.

Simon Kaufman:

I think you got to be, really think you got to be these days.

Carole Freeman:

That’s something to be proud of.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, they should have a library credit score, show what a good citizen you are by how quickly return your library books.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah, Simon we checked your score. You can do the magazines, but not the fiction or nonfiction. Just take a magazine. That’s all you can do, no CDs.

Carole Freeman:

And the reference section where they let you actually you can only use those while you’re at the library? You are limited like 15 minutes at a time even in that section.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah, move it along, pal.

Carole Freeman:

All right, speaking of that, wow. Oh, hey, since we’ve got all the credentials we’ve covered, you have a valid library card. Time to circle and get all that stuff.

Simon Kaufman:

I did.

Carole Freeman:

We better make sure we cover the medical disclaimer just so people-

Simon Kaufman:

Yes, this show is meant for educational entertainment purposes only. It’s not meant as medical advice, nor intended to diagnose, treat, cure any condition. If you have any medical condition, illness, disease, taking any medications or behind on your library fines, please talk to a medical professional or a library associate.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah. I wonder if there’s a 12 step program for like, over checker outers anonymous, like those people that get too many books. So, all right, well, question of the day for the listeners. You have a choice today, actually. So if you track on keto, if so yes or no, what app do you use? Or alternatively, how many books do you have checked out from the library right now? Well, they keto or non, just chime in. We can see your comments here. So join the show. We’re here. It’s interactive.

Simon Kaufman:

And I’m telling you tracking is the hardest part of keto, in my opinion. Anybody can shove a slice of salami in their mouth, or eggs or bacon or what have you, but can you write it down? It’s hard enough.

Carole Freeman:

Not anybody’s actually going to put bacon in their mouth. So but maybe the salami, I mean, except the vegans, anyways, nevermind. Well, hopefully, after today, where I talk about why you should track, why it’s so valuable. Hopefully, it will motivate you to give it a try at least.

Simon Kaufman:

So I do it for a day and then I do it for another half day. And then I just get lost in my life, it’s hard enough, man. It’s hard to do to track. So let’s talk about it. Let’s talk about the tracking. The macking and the tracking, the tracking of the macros.

Carole Freeman:

Well, I want to tease people a little bit with it and do a couple other things first.

Simon Kaufman:

All right. You are such a tease Carole, I swear.

Carole Freeman:

Well, this day and age, we got to make sure we keep people educated, entertained. And I mean, by this point, I think people may be interested in what’s going on in our life. I don’t know, maybe they don’t give a crap about us. But what have you been up to? I know, you just got off a meeting, you’re going to be doing some-

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah, nothing’s in the works yet. But I just talked to the American Cancer Society. And we’re going to be doing some fundraising comedy shows.

Carole Freeman:

That’s great.

Simon Kaufman:

I fundraise for them every year, it used to be called The Real Men Wear Pink. So yes, I am a real man. They’re changing the name here in Washington state but I’ll definitely get more news for you coming down the pike. But yeah, we’re going to be helping out to raise money for breast cancer through comedy. [crosstalk 00:07:42]we’ll get that I just got off a nice meeting with them. And we’ll come to Phoenix and do a show, Carole.

Carole Freeman:

That’s great.

Simon Kaufman:

Because every week you look tanner and I look just paler. Every week, I get whiter and you get tanner. So we’re going to have to come down to Phoenix, Arizona and help raise money. So that’s what’s going on in my life right now.

Carole Freeman:

Well, that’s great, because that goes hand in hand keto diet for a lot of different types of cancer is actually very effective, adjunctive protocol for that, too. So it goes hand in hand. And, my personal update is those that you actually can see us aren’t just listening to the audio like, yes, my hair, I did something different with my hair. I hadn’t had a haircut in a year so I thought, let’s do something radical and change the color of it. So you’re going to have to tune in and see us on YouTube or in the Facebook group to see what it looks like.

Simon Kaufman:

You go, girl. Get it, girl.

Carole Freeman:

Well, let’s see. They say blondes have more fun. So we’ll see how that goes. I hope I don’t get dumber too. If I just go with all the stereotypes.

Simon Kaufman:

Even your hair’s getting tanner.

Carole Freeman:

Frankly, one of the reasons I moved to Phoenix was that, health studies show that when you live in 42 degrees latitude on the planet, which happens to just run through Reno, Nevada, so I’m south of there, but any place south of that, you actually get better health outcomes from more sun exposure.

Simon Kaufman:

Nevada is healthy. Is that what you’re telling me? Reno is good for your health. I never heard that before.

Carole Freeman:

I learned that fun fact from Robb Wolf, because he had moved there, a few years ago, he moved to Reno. And I got to interview him at his place down there

Simon Kaufman:

Who’s that?

Carole Freeman:

Robb Wolf. He’s big in the Paleo world. He’s actually also crossing over in the keto space as well, too. All right, well back to the [crosstalk 00:09:38]with Simon. So this is part of why I’m doing this series and restart that but this is a part six today, part five of a 10 part series of the 10 rules to follow to get started with keto for the best results. Now, so that’s what these rules are. If you want maximum weight loss, you want to get into ketosis as fast as possible and you also want to address the psychology of what makes us have cravings, over eat and not be able to change habits long term. That’s what the whole package is here. So if you’re struggling at all on keto, to get the results that you want, these 10 rules are for you. And so today is number five in that series.

Carole Freeman:

But before we go to that, you found a random article for me that we’re just going to pull up here. So let’s see, Katherine says, I started off tracking well, but have fizzled out. I do and I didn’t see the benefits of tracking. I just need to get back to doing it.

Simon Kaufman:

So I agree with Katherine, I agree with you. It’s hard. Anybody could make scrambled eggs. Well, maybe not anybody. Okay. I’m sure half of you women have dated a guy that couldn’t scramble an egg to save his life but it’s not easy. It’s like there’s so much going on in life. You got your to do lists, you got your job, many people have their kids and you got to exercise and you should journal, that’s important. And go for walks and spend time with loved ones and I got to type in this little thing on this tracking phone.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, yeah.

Simon Kaufman:

[crosstalk 00:11:17] Carole.

Carole Freeman:

Well, along the lines with what Katherine is saying too, is that I find that it works well to do it in sprints, so committing to a period of time of doing it, having a goal in mind of why you’re tracking. And then when you get there, it’s okay to coast once in a while and take a break from it. So that’s kind of taking a reset. And Katherine’s been through one of my, both Kathy and Nancy, they’re here, Katherine, sorry, not Kathy, Katherine and Nancy are here. They’ve been through my program where they got that track at the beginning. And they did that for nine week period. And they get really good results. And then they often go into like, kind of a coasting period. It’s like you’re whitewater river rafting. And once in a while, you got to just enjoy the smooth part of the journey and enjoy the scenery. And then if you want to hit your next goal, maybe that’s another five or 10 pounds then using these 10 rules that we’re going over here are going to be essential to being able to reach your next milestone goal.

Simon Kaufman:

Okay.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, so we always, if you have been listening to our series here, we always have a random, or maybe not so random news article. Simon just pulled this one up for me. It’s a challenge. So I have not read this article. We’re going to do that first, just because there’s so much information out there about keto. And so sometimes we’ll bring up articles that are research about keto, sometimes just a random Google search. What comes up on keto? Because there’s so much misinformation out there. So many mixed pieces of information. So what’s the article that you found here, Simon?

Simon Kaufman:

It is from the University of Chicago medicine.

Carole Freeman:

Oh, sounds fancy.

Simon Kaufman:

Fancy. They got a pretty good, I think they got a medical school there.

Carole Freeman:

So it says at the front, we’ll have to put this article link in the well actually, I think I can put it in the notes right now here. Let’s see. But those of you want to follow along, okay. Again, I’ve not previewed this. So let’s see what this is all about. So my clients often bring all kinds of information. Like I saw this in a book, I saw this in an article, I heard this on a podcast. What does this mean? All right, so what is this one saying? This article is keto genic diet, what are the risks? This is from June of 2019. So almost two year old article. Right off the bat, it’s calling it a fad diet often come with big promises of weight loss and optimal health, but what are the risks?

Carole Freeman:

So we’ve got the University of Chicago medicine, Ingalls Memorial dieticians, say the ketogenic or keto diet, which has gained popularity in the last seven years, extremely difficult and strict and difficult to maintain. Oh, boy.

Simon Kaufman:

That’s because they don’t have Keto Chat LIVE.

Carole Freeman:

Right. Exactly. Yeah. So here’s what I find is that you can divide the internet on keto into two places. So one group are going to be credentialed health care providers, nurses, dieticians, doctors, that all say it’s a fad diet, it’s too hard to follow. It’s too restrictive. It’s not safe, it’s not healthy. And universally every one of those people, they’ve never tried it themselves. And they also have never implemented in their clients. We’ve got the other side of the internet that are those same credential health care providers that will say, not only is it delicious and sustainable, if done right and healthy, not only healthy, but like transforms people’s health in ways that they never saw trying to do just regular calorie restriction diets.

Carole Freeman:

And those characteristics they share in common is that those people have tried it themselves. And usually they’ve also implemented it with their patients as well. So any clinician that’s ever done it clinically, with patients, clients, they all can see that it’s not a fad. Here’s more information about the background of this is actually carbohydrate restriction. So keto is a form of carbohydrate restriction diet, low carb diet.

Carole Freeman:

This type of dieting to lose weight is the longest recorded oldest form of dieting that there is out there. The name keto diet is the part that’s new, the technique is old as can be. In fact, the very first diet book ever written in the 1800s, was a low carb diet. And so, again, people that are saying this is a fad, also don’t even know the history of dieting in this country, or even around the world. So the guy who wrote that original diet book was William Banting. And if you go to South Africa, they don’t call it a keto diet, they call it a Banting.

Carole Freeman:

So this is just a call back to how old this dietary practice is, how effective it is. Now, there’s several books out there that will kind of go through the history of how it fell out of favor. So basically, it boils down to, we went through a period of time where they thought that fat was evil, and it caused all the bad things that we were going through, that’s kind of the last 40 or 50 years.

Carole Freeman:

And so then, Atkins still was out there, Atkins diet was what it was, even up through the 90s, but it started to fall out of fashion because people became afraid of fat. And then we were told, well, don’t eat fat, eat lots of carbs. And eat seven to 11 servings of bread, rice and grains every single day. Right? And what happened, people started doing that, and then their weights, everybody’s weight has gone up since then. And all these chronic diseases and illnesses have gone up. So yeah, so those are some of my highlights of why this, there are some points in this article I can see of like, what is ketosis? They’re talking about, let’s see, they’re talking about dangers of it. It could cause low blood pressure.

Carole Freeman:

Okay, so last week, we talked about salt. If you’re not adding enough salt to your keto diet, yes, you could have low blood pressure. This is talking about kidney stones. So a lot of the risks they’re pulling from also are what they see in little kids with epilepsy. They’re using a therapeutic medical, therapeutic ketogenic diet, which is different than what we’re talking about. But also there aren’t a lot of medications. And so I think Dr. Nally did a really good job of covering all these. He’s got some articles out there about covering like discrediting these myths about these terrible side effects that can happen on keto.

Simon Kaufman:

So there’s a doctor named Nally?

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, Nally.

Simon Kaufman:

What next? Like nurse Hidden Valley Ranch. Any doctor named Nally’s or Dr. Frito-Lay. I don’t know if I trust them.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, Nally is in practice right next door to two doctors are in co-practice, Frito and Lay. Yeah. Dr. Nally is actually out here in what we call the Valley of the Sun, he’s in the suburbs of Phoenix in, surprise, Arizona.

Simon Kaufman:

To low Reno? Once you get to low Reno.

Carole Freeman:

Yes, yes. I never-

Simon Kaufman:

I think I’m starting to get what’s lower than Reno.

Carole Freeman:

Some people claim that about Phoenix so yeah, I get it. I get it. Not everybody loves it out here. So anyways, that’s that article. That’s fun. So there’s plenty of those too. Any other questions about that?

Carole Freeman:

So two doctors that come to mind that have been doing this for decades. Right. So Dr. Eric Westman, he’s on the east coast. And he’s actually been doing this work for 30 years or more. And here we got one laughy face that’s great. Oh, it’s Nancy. Thanks, Nancy. She’s being entertained at least so.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, so he’s been doing this work clinically 30 years and basically everything that you can measure, check, gets better when people follow a low carb diet. Dr. Ted Naman in the Seattle area. I’ve interviewed him he says the same thing. I asked, what gets better when people follow a low carb keto diet. He says, everything, everything you can measure gets better.

Carole Freeman:

As well as a Dr. Jeffery Gerber, who’s written Eat Rich, Live Long. He’s also been doing following it not only himself but 100% of his clinical practice. While I don’t know about 100%, but he does that therapeutically with his patients as well. He’s been doing it for decades. And also same thing, like everything gets better. So these articles you can find that say like, it’s bad, it’s dangerous. It’s a fad, they’re just rolling around the same talking points of people that actually don’t even use it clinically.

Simon Kaufman:

Well, historically, 100 years ago, they never called it the keto diet. They just called it, I have no food. I’m starving.

Carole Freeman:

Right, but back in the 17 and 1800s, or 16, 1700s that’s what it was, you didn’t need diets because-

Simon Kaufman:

The no food diet [crosstalk 00:19:54]

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, we had naturally weight gain and weight loss cycles. They were called starvation seasons.

Simon Kaufman:

They were called monsoon season when everything got washed away, okay.

Carole Freeman:

They were called, honey, the crops failed again.

Simon Kaufman:

Exactly. The goat ran away.

Carole Freeman:

Oh, it’s only in this world of excess to me to make jokes about starvation.

Simon Kaufman:

So why is tracking essential to keto, when we can just like flex in the mirror to see how good we’re doing?

Carole Freeman:

Yeah. All right, well, let’s get into it. Then rule number five, easy rule. Okay, so there’s some discussion here. You guys don’t think it’s easy to track. But the 10 rules to follow to get started with the easiest results. So why tracking? Well, first of all, let’s say you want to talk about why first, okay.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah, why?

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, why? Why do I have to? So first of all, the first four rules were, you need to keep your carbs under 20. You need to get a certain amount of protein. And you got to get some fat in there. And you need to get enough salt. So in order to follow those four rules, how do you know you’re doing any of that unless you’re tracking?

Simon Kaufman:

You flex in the mirror?

Carole Freeman:

You just put salami in your face. Is that what it is? So basically, it’s like, if you’re not tracking, there’s no way you’ll know, if you’re getting your carbs under 20. There’s no way you’ll know if you’re getting enough protein, there’s no way that you’ll know if you’re getting enough salt.

Simon Kaufman:

It’s a mystery.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, it’s just guessing.

Simon Kaufman:

Like does Bigfoot exist? I don’t know.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah. Here’s somebody sharing because carbs are hidden everywhere. That’s also one as well. So if we just talk about like, how do you know if you’re getting 20 grams of carbs or less. Everyone I’ve ever worked with, I have them track with a certain app, will mention which ones I recommend here in a minute. But every one of them track with the app that I like to use, because it’s extremely accurate. And every one of them go, eggs have carbs, coffee has carbs, cream has carbs. So it actually gets a reality check of foods that you didn’t even know had carbs in them, you assumed they didn’t have any carbohydrates, that you assumed you can eat as much as you wanted. And because keto is an extreme carb restriction diet, 20 total grams or less a day, it’s not very many. That’s equivalent of four teaspoons worth of sugar, carbohydrates. That’s it. It’s not very many carbohydrates.

Simon Kaufman:

So I can only have four teaspoons of sugar?

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, nothing else. You could, yeah, you’re probably going to feel miserable. But that would be your carb limit for the day.

Simon Kaufman:

The sugar diet.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, yeah. There are people out there that promote things like the potato diet. But this show is about keto. So really it’s the only way to know that you’re getting your carbs low enough. And so I see over and over again, when people are struggling with not getting into ketosis, it’s because they’re overeating carbs. And they just have no idea that they are.

Carole Freeman:

A lot of ladies I’m working with have tried every diet under the sun. And they’re used to vegetables being a free food, and you can eat as much as you want. They’re often really, really surprised to find out that they actually have to limit their servings of vegetables in order to keep their carbs low enough. So and again, the only way to know that is if you’re actually weighing and measuring the food.

Simon Kaufman:

[crosstalk 00:23:28]

Carole Freeman:

Heather is saying she was surprised to find out carbs in oysters.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah, what’s up with that? Really?

Carole Freeman:

Well, surprise.

Simon Kaufman:

We got to change that, Carole, what can we do about that?

Carole Freeman:

Well, actually, maybe you should do some genetically modified, some farm raised oysters, and then you could put the oysters on a low carb diet, I’m thinking and then you could get the oysters ripped and jacked. Get them leaner, less carbohydrates in them. No? No? You don’t want to do that?

Simon Kaufman:

So what does not have carbs. Like if I just breathe, does that have carbs?

Carole Freeman:

A little bit, just traces. There’re actually are very few foods that are 100% carb free. Those are going to be things that are pure fat, which you don’t want to just eat pure fat because there’s not a lot of vitamins and minerals in there. So butter is essentially carb free, olive oil, bacon grease, so the things that mayonnaise-

Simon Kaufman:

The four basic food groups?

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, yeah.

Simon Kaufman:

Mayonnaise, grease, oil. That’s good.

Carole Freeman:

You’re asking for the loophole. You’re like, well, if I just eat foods that don’t have carbs, then I don’t have to track away right. So I’m going to add in what I’m recommending new tracks in addition to just food. I recommend that people, so not only tracking all foods, so they can discover what has carbs that you didn’t know, what portion is going to keep you under your carb limit, but also tracking your food and beverage, your beverages, tracking salt. So last week’s episode was all about salt and how to get enough of that. So you need to track that too. But also you want to track your body. So not just flexing in the mirror, but step on the scale once in a while, take a waist measurement. I also recommend that people keep track of what I call your top five, why. So this gives you more motivation to keep going.

Carole Freeman:

So this is something I explore with my clients. Like, why is it so important? Okay, so a lot of people, it’s the number on the scale, but in addition to that, they have more things that they want, right? Like they want more energy, mental clarity, they want less pain in their body. They want to be healthy for as long as possible, vanity reasons, they want to look young and healthy for a long period of time, they want to maintain good memory and brain function and on and on and on.

Simon Kaufman:

So I’m wondering if I was ever even in ketosis even during the six months that I was doing it.

Carole Freeman:

It’s hard to know. Yeah.

Simon Kaufman:

I blame ketosis.

Carole Freeman:

You blame ketosis? Yeah.

Simon Kaufman:

Well, no, but how do you know you’re in ketosis without tracking, is there a feeling like you’re like, Is there a?

Carole Freeman:

It can be so and to speak at that point as well. Like, I find that when people aren’t tracking, at least initially, they get stuck in this, I call it carb, no man’s land, right. So if your carbs are high enough, your body can just run on carbs all the time. But you have to eat them frequently. That’s why you get hungrier on a higher carb diet. If your carbs are extremely low, below 20 grams is what’s recommended to get started with keto, then it forces your body to start to burn fat and make ketones for fuel sources. But if you’re in the middle, so if you’re formerly very high carb diet, and you’re somewhere and 50, 60, 80 grams of carbs a day, because you just don’t know how many carbs you’re eating. It’s not low enough to get you into ketosis solidly.

Carole Freeman:

And also, it’s not high enough to actually run on carbs. And so when people are in that zone, they typically they don’t ever get like the keto bliss that everybody talks about, where they get more energy and mental clarity. They just kind of feel sluggish and blah, and like, kind of hungry still. And it’s like they feel a little better, but still not that great. And so I call it carb, no man’s land. And then when they finally apply these 10 rules that I’m talking about, and actually trackway and measure everything. Then they have [crosstalk 00:27:30]

Simon Kaufman:

The carb promised land?

Carole Freeman:

The carb promised land, yes.

Simon Kaufman:

Where you achieve eternal bliss?

Carole Freeman:

Yes.

Simon Kaufman:

You’re promising us bliss? Is that it, Carole? You’re saying we can achieve bliss?

Carole Freeman:

Is that a medical term?

Simon Kaufman:

Well, I mean, obviously, we would never diagnose, treat or tell you-

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, I can’t promise anything. But the experience I’ve had with working with my clients is that they all feel so much better than when they were trying to do it on their own. For all these, usually it’s these 10 rules that they implement big time in order to get there. So I would say to overcome the hesitancy, like the difficulty of it is to set a goal for yourself, like to track for 30 days, track for 21 days and determine like, what are the reasons why you want to do that? Like, maybe it’s weight loss, but see if you can come up with five different reasons why you want to actually follow keto completely, and then-

Simon Kaufman:

Can you [inaudible 00:28:33] what it’s like to make sure I’m in ketosis?

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, I mean, that’s a good one. And I know you’ve got other reasons why you want that as well.

Simon Kaufman:

So probably not going to be able to eat like three meals a day, right?

Carole Freeman:

You sure can. But typically, the people I work with, they find that their appetite goes down and the only two meals a day or maybe one. You can eat three, some people eat three meals a day. I’m big on customizing it for each person’s own body likes and lifestyle. There’s no hard and fast like everyone can only eat one meal, every can only eat two, it just depends on your own appetite.

Simon Kaufman:

So if I track for 21 days straight, will you buy me a present?

Carole Freeman:

It depends.

Simon Kaufman:

I deserve one.

Carole Freeman:

Nancy says she wants two presents, Nancy or do you want two meals for … I’m thinking she’s saying she eats two meals a day but-

Simon Kaufman:

Well, if Nancy is getting two presents, I want to present.

Carole Freeman:

Is that what motivated you as a kid, Simon? Is that what your mom did? Like Simon, if you are good-

Simon Kaufman:

I think you should buy me a present or something, I don’t know like a race car toy or something.

Carole Freeman:

Race car bed?

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah, race car bed.

Carole Freeman:

Race car sheets.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah. Don’t judge me.

Carole Freeman:

Two presents, a race car bed and race car sheets for the race car bed.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah.

Carole Freeman:

I think I’m understanding how your mom motivated you when you’re a little kid like Simon, if you’re a good boy today. I’ll get your present.

Simon Kaufman:

Well, sure. I think I just proved it.

Carole Freeman:

What if you just buy a present?

Simon Kaufman:

Myself?

Carole Freeman:

Yeah.

Simon Kaufman:

That’s not right, what’s wrong with you buying?

Carole Freeman:

What’s the motivation for me for you for tracking? Like what’s in it for me to buy you a present because you tracked?

Simon Kaufman:

Because you helped me achieve bliss.

Carole Freeman:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), okay.

Simon Kaufman:

You do not even care? Do you not even care about my bliss? Is my bliss not important to you?

Carole Freeman:

I mean it is, I want everyone to feel bliss. I also feel like everyone should be responsible for their own bliss. I mean, we could do this game. Well, I know one of the things on your wish list is a ketone meter that you probably would want it sooner than 21 days.

Simon Kaufman:

Okay, you’re right. If I track for seven days, you buy me a present.

Carole Freeman:

What if track work for 21 days and the present is going to be a new pair of pants because yours are going to be too big or new [crosstalk 00:30:59] I got a shop at like, down here they have a store called Five Below. And it’s kind of like the bougie version of dollar store. Everything is $5 or less in the store and it smells.

Simon Kaufman:

It’s not five degrees latitude or longitude below Reno?

Carole Freeman:

Katherine’s very, very clever. Your present is going to be the bliss, Simon. So yes, I’ll give you bliss if you-

Simon Kaufman:

Look at you getting wisdom on us, all zen wisdom on us, man.

Carole Freeman:

Oh, there you go. Yeah.

Simon Kaufman:

The bliss is the present itself?

Carole Freeman:

Yes. What does that phrase about like the-

Simon Kaufman:

Confucius says, “The bliss is its own gift.”

Carole Freeman:

Yes. The past is a memory. The future is an illusion. And the present is your gift. I just made that up.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah, I don’t know. Okay, I’m going to have to track though, activate a bliss.

Carole Freeman:

Well, one of the psychological tricks of that is just like, set yourself a goal of this is how I’m going to do it, visual tracking is really, really helpful for people too so whether you’ve got a printed calendar, and you can check off the days, give yourself a star.

Carole Freeman:

There are apps that actually are streak trackers different than streaking tracking. This is a streak tracker, how long you’ve done something consistently in a row.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah, track your streaking, because it can be used as evidence in court. But what if you use negative motivation, like a dog shot-caller that just electrocute you if you don’t track? Yeah, maybe we should develop that app.

Carole Freeman:

Does that work remotely? Like I don’t know, if I have it here and if you haven’t tracked by a certain time, I could shock you and that’s a totally [crosstalk 00:32:53]

Simon Kaufman:

That would be real motivation, I feel. I feel that would be motivating. Like, I’ll be like, I got to track I’m going to get shocked.

Carole Freeman:

That’s like a whole different business model. That’s like an only fans, dominatrix keto tracker shocker.

Simon Kaufman:

No, I think there’s a market, I really think there’s a market for that.

Carole Freeman:

And I think that probably can charge even more than I charge for my services for certain people.

Simon Kaufman:

Well, hell Carole, I mean, don’t knock it till you tried it.

Carole Freeman:

I just don’t like causing pain to people. I’m just not cut out for that. So little rubber band on your wrist, I tried that.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah, got to figure it out. I guess you got to do it. I thought about like writing it down in a journal and then putting it all in at the end of the day.

Carole Freeman:

Well, let’s that bleeds into the next part of how to track.

Simon Kaufman:

How to track.

Carole Freeman:

Perfect segue.

Simon Kaufman:

You like that.

Carole Freeman:

First of all, there’s a lot of different apps that people like out there, there’s Carb Manager, My Fitness Pal, those are probably kind of the top ones. I prefer one called Chronometer, C-H-R-O-N-O-M-E-T-E-R. I prefer it for a couple of reasons. One is that there’s a professional version of it. That’s what I use with my clients. And so I can go in and custom set their macros, I can access their food logs at any time. That’s one of the reasons I really like it.

Carole Freeman:

Probably the more keto reason, is that their database is extremely accurate, It’s down to one hundredths of a gram of protein, fats and carbs. And so this is where people really find all those hidden carbs and foods, because the other apps actually are just what’s on the label and food manufacturers are allowed to round up or round down. And guess what, for carbs, they get around down to zero quite frequently. And so Chronometer is my favorite because it’s much more accurate. Also, it tracks vitamins and minerals. So if you really want to get really healthy with this, then you can look at that as well too. So I recommend that.

Carole Freeman:

Also, it’s just from everybody I’ve worked with the last five years like we’ve just found universally that you got to put the food into your tracker first before you eat it. Because that’s the only way to know how many carbs are in it, right?

Carole Freeman:

So if you eat whatever you want to eat during the day, and then you put it in the tracker, you’re going to be like, “Oh, crap, that was 50 grams of carbs total.” Okay, try again tomorrow, and then you’re just guessing. So, if you put it in beforehand, it’s a little bit of a science experiment where you can actually say, “Okay, if I eat a cup of broccoli, right now, that’s going to be 12 grams of carbs, that’s way too many. But if I do three quarters of a cup, or half a cup, that’s going to keep my carbs in alignment.” So before you eat is typically what’s going to be necessary, because it’s part of the planning of what you’re going to eat.

Carole Freeman:

Then also, so I recommend tracking. So not only all food, beverage and your salt, but also tracking. So Chronometer also allows you to put in your weight on the scale, your body measurements, and so on. And you can also track in Chronometer, this is not sponsored by them, they haven’t paid me any money, but-

Simon Kaufman:

They should, maybe they’ll buy me a present.

Carole Freeman:

Maybe they’ll give me a couple of months free. I’ve been a good client of theirs for a long time. Also you can add in other things that are non body measurements. So what I talked about, like the five reasons why you want to do this, you can add those in manually as well and track those. So like your sleep and your mood and energy levels and things like that, too.

Carole Freeman:

Oh, look at all these people. They’re coaching you, Simon. So Nancy’s got a good idea. So, Nancy, you said you struggle with tracking as well. So maybe this is a tip for yourself, too. So find a friend to be accountable to. That’s why Simon wants me to shock him every day if he doesn’t track.

Simon Kaufman:

Well, I really want the present.

Carole Freeman:

Okay, we see how you’re motivated. Okay, well, I have to make a wish list. Maybe well, that really would have to be the one thing you want the most but I don’t know this is. Okay, so what’s Katherine say here? She’s got a Chronometer question. Can we copy a meal over from a previous date so I’m not having to enter things over and over again? Yes, actually, you totally can.

Carole Freeman:

And so you can do it a couple of ways, Katherine. One, I know there’s a way on the app, I think it’s like you swipe over and then there’s some choices of copy. And then you can go to the next date and select paste. And then on the desktop version you’d like right click on it, and copy it and paste it. But you could also select the whole meal. So for you guys that work with me, I have it set up as categories. So if you click on the heading, for example, Breakfast, they will highlight all of the food there. And then if you right click there, you can copy all of it and then paste all of it over there as well too. So yeah, makes it much easier.

Carole Freeman:

The other thing with Chronometer, typically, people tend to eat the same foods over and over again. And the more you use it, just the foods that show up first when you click Add Food are going to be your top foods enter anyway, so it makes it really fast, plus Simon, Nancy, I don’t know if you know this either, but they have a barcode scanner, which makes it really easy, you just click on that and scan the food and it puts it in for you.

Simon Kaufman:

So the hardest part is when you make a big salad or something with 10 ingredients and you have to put all 10 ingredients in-

Carole Freeman:

Well, absolutely. So which is one of my, where’s my list of the things we’re going to talk about, rule number eight addresses that which is like basically keeping it really, really simple so it doesn’t make it too hard. Picking one protein, one vegetable and one fat per meal basically is what’s going to help it so that it’s not so hard to track things.

Simon Kaufman:

Okay, cool.

Carole Freeman:

Good idea, Nancy from Katherine. Katherine is going to give it a try. Look, see, my goal was to give people reasons enough that they would track and look at this everybody’s getting excited about it. Yeah, okay, we covered all those things. All right. Yay, we’ve got three new trackers on board so all right you mother-trackers.

Simon Kaufman:

Don’t knock it till you’ve tracked it.

Carole Freeman:

I guess Simon can’t be a mother-tracker, you’re just going to be a tracker dude. I don’t know.

Simon Kaufman:

Yes, I can. How dare you?

Carole Freeman:

I was going to ask if the cancer benefit is going gender neutral with their campaign about Real Men Wear Pink because that part of why they change their name.

Simon Kaufman:

They are doing in Seattle market in the Los Angeles and Oakland, they are trying something new, whereas before it was only men, now they’re opening it up, yes, to especially I think since COVID. People have less to give many people and it was a down year in raising funds. So they are trying a new pilot program where it’s just going to be anybody can raise funds.

Carole Freeman:

Oh, what? That’s great. Well, I look forward to hearing more coming episodes about your shows. That’s great.

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah. Are you going to be more tan next week than this week? I just want to know right now, because I feel like I can’t keep up, Carole.

Carole Freeman:

Next week, my hair is going to be white and I actually custom mix my foundation makeup so I know that I’m getting tanner because it takes more of the darker color to mix it so yeah, probably.

Simon Kaufman:

I don’t know anything of what you just said. But keep going.

Carole Freeman:

Well okay, so one of these times I’ll just have to give you some makeup tips for, I mean, you’ve been on television before, they did your makeup, right?

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah, I’d never did it myself.

Carole Freeman:

You were on the 425, you were on the Millionaire Matchmaker. Did you guys know we have a big celebrity here, so you too could live next to a brick wall if you were [crosstalk 00:40:37]

Simon Kaufman:

You too would look white and pasty in front of a brick wall. I’m going to have to come to Phoenix.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah.

Simon Kaufman:

I’m coming. That’s not a threat. I’m not trying to threaten you in public. I’m just going to come visit you, that’s all.

Carole Freeman:

I’ve got room for a guest. I technically have a guest room but I have plenty of room for guests. So you’re welcome to come and get a nice sunburn and go back up to Seattle.

Simon Kaufman:

That’d be good. Rub aloe vera on myself. Okay, good.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, I mean, it grows here naturally. So it’s like all in one.

Simon Kaufman:

There you are, okay.

Carole Freeman:

All right. Oh, right. Good. Good. Any other questions about why you should track way measure? So you have a goal, you are going to do seven days, you’re going to do 21, what’s your gift wish?

Simon Kaufman:

I don’t know. Well, it has to be a surprise gift, Carole?

Carole Freeman:

Oh, really? Okay. It has to be a surprise. See, it just depends, right? So if I was doing this, I would want to know what the gift I was working for. But you’re a different personality.

Simon Kaufman:

Oh, you’re right. You’re right. It should be how about, Denali? New car Denali?

Carole Freeman:

Oh, I bet I could find the cutest little match[crosstalk 00:41:44]

Simon Kaufman:

You already got student loans, you might as well just add to your debt and hook me up.

Carole Freeman:

Yeah, you’re right. Like that’s the American way like some debt is good, more must be better.

Simon Kaufman:

So yeah. At least you know I tracked my macros for seven days.

Carole Freeman:

Does that get passed down? It’s like reverse inheritance. I’m going to leave my son with all my debt and good old Sallie Mae is going to [crosstalk 00:42:07].

Simon Kaufman:

Yeah, well, I’ll tell you what, I don’t know. But I will come up with something soon. And we’ll make a challenge by next week.

Carole Freeman:

Okay, I had this idea too for Katherine and Nancy, if you both are having challenge tracking as well, you guys can connect. Well, I know Katherine is watching on YouTube and Nancy’s in the Facebook group. So you guys may have to come in the Facebook group together to connect but, here’s a crazy idea related to this gift thing is that what if you teamed up with a partner so Nancy’s idea was find a friend to be accountable to, Simon’s idea was give me a present. So what if you found-

Simon Kaufman:

A white elephant, keto tracking, Keto Chat LIVE gift giving?

Carole Freeman:

Yes.

Simon Kaufman:

Okay, I’m there.

Carole Freeman:

You find a partner to make a commitment to and once you both fulfill that, then you get to send the other one a gift. So when they reach their goal, you send them their surprise gift and then vice versa. World needs more surprise gift giving, right? I love it. That’s a great idea. Let me know if somebody else tries that.

Simon Kaufman:

That was a good idea, Carole. I’m just saying, Oh, that was a good idea.

Carole Freeman:

Well, you so I should find something I want to do. I’ll track for the same amount of time as you and then you have to send me a present then.

Simon Kaufman:

I’ll send you a present. You can drive my Denali. I’ll even let you be in control of the music when you ride in my Denali that you buy me.

Carole Freeman:

You’ll let me touch the volume control. That’s great.

Simon Kaufman:

No, no, you can just pick the music. Come on, Carole, don’t get carried away.

Carole Freeman:

I can verbally say what song I want, but not allowed to touch it?

Simon Kaufman:

Don’t get carried away.

Carole Freeman:

I suppose you’re going to want like an old school one with like a six disc changer in the trunk too, right?

Simon Kaufman:

Sure.

Carole Freeman:

You are going to save me money if I get an older one for you.

Simon Kaufman:

So well, as long as it isn’t so old that it has an eight track player, I think we should be fine.

Carole Freeman:

Okay. That would be a Camaro. But all right, Katherine says that’s a fun idea. So let me know if you guys implement that. So this is crowdsourcing ideas. This is great.

Simon Kaufman:

Well, this is great. We’re making a big difference, coming up with great ideas. So is there anything else or what? [crosstalk 00:44:15]

Carole Freeman:

I think that we covered it, anybody have any other questions, because next week, we’re going to talk about why avoiding keto sweeteners, at least in the beginning, is also going to be part of a formula of getting the best results. So again, remember, this is a 10 part series. So next week is going to be rule number six to follow and it’s going to be all about sweeteners. It’s not going to be what you think. And Simon’s got a recommendation for you here about what to do in the meantime.

Simon Kaufman:

Well, yeah, you can join our Facebook group, our keto chat lifestyle support. You can follow us on YouTube. And yeah, join the Keto Chat LIVE gift giving revolution.

Carole Freeman:

Yes, yes. Different rewards. Yeah, so today we talked about rule number. Oh man, am I getting the numbers wrong?

Simon Kaufman:

Five?

Carole Freeman:

Number five. Yeah, I got the number right here. Rule number five-

Simon Kaufman:

I’ll help you with your counting, Carole. Don’t worry, I got this.

Carole Freeman:

Oh, see I put the wrong, that’s what I got. Okay, yeah. So today we talked about rule number five, why you need to track, why it’s so important. And I think we have a few converse. We have some ladies here who have done it in the past. And we really dug into why it’s so important, why it’s such a foundation of getting those results. So you can’t know what you’re doing unless you actually track so we did come up with some strategies as well about how to help increase your motivation for doing that, setting some goals and partnering with a partner to get a present if you follow through on your commitment.

Simon Kaufman:

Everybody needs a present partner.

Carole Freeman:

Oh my gosh, this has been so fun. All right. All right. Well, thank you everyone for watching, pop in your questions you’ve got there, we’re going to pop in on the Facebook group and YouTube, we get notified if you ask questions after we’re done LIVE. But hey, guess what, every week now 4 p.m. Pacific on Thursdays we’re live the show both on in the Facebook group, and also on YouTube. So watch all the episodes and let us know what you think and mark your calendars. Send us all the questions.

Simon Kaufman:

All right, thank you Carole.

Carole Freeman:

Rules one two and three. Nancy, you’ll have to go back and watch the other episodes, they are in the Facebook group that you’re in currently so you’ll be able to watch those videos right there in the Facebook group. So all right, good plug for the past episodes. Thanks for that, Nancy.

Simon Kaufman:

That was a good plug. I like that, good point.

Carole Freeman:

Good job, Nancy. We’re going to partner you with a present partner very soon.

Simon Kaufman:

Everybody needs a present partner.

Carole Freeman:

Oh my god, we have a perfect present partner theme song now, that’s amazing. Katherine, thank you, Carole and Simon. You’re welcome, Katherine. Thank you, Nancy and Katherine and whoever else has been looking, watching me, we appreciate you all. Let’s turn this backwards thing, there we go.

Simon Kaufman:

Bye. Right.

Notes:

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